Nymph definition

nĭmf
Frequency:
A sexually mature and attractive young woman.
noun
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(greek & roman mythology) Any of numerous minor deities represented as beautiful maidens inhabiting and sometimes personifying features of nature such as trees, waters, and mountains.
noun
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(class. myth.) Any of a group of minor nature goddesses, represented as young and beautiful and living in rivers, mountains, or trees.
noun
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The immature form of those insects that do not pass through a pupal stage. Nymphs usually resemble the adults, but are smaller, lack fully developed wings, and are sexually immature.
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A young girl, especially one who inspires lustful feelings.
noun
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The eight-legged immature form of certain arachnids, such as ticks and mites.
noun
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The immature form of an insect, such as a grasshopper, that does not pass through a pupal stage during metamorphosis. Nymphs resemble adults but are smaller and lack fully developed wings.
noun
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3
A young woman; maiden: literary or playful usage.
noun
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0
A lovely young woman.
noun
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(entomology) The young of an insect with incomplete metamorphosis, differing from the adult primarily in size and structural proportions.
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Plural form of nymph.
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(Greek & Roman mythology) Any minor female deity associated with water, forests, grotto, etc.
noun
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The definition of a nymph is a mythical spirit or goddess, or a beautiful young woman.

A mythical female spirit who lives in the mountains is an example of a nymph.

noun
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1
The immature form of an insect, such as a grasshopper, that does not pass through a pupal stage during metamorphosis. Nymphs resemble adults but are smaller and lack fully developed wings.
noun
0
1
The eight-legged immature form of certain arachnids, such as ticks and mites.
noun
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1
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The larva of certain insects.
noun
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
nymph
Plural:
nymphs

Origin of nymph

  • Middle English nimphe from Old French from Latin nympha from Greek numphē

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English nimphe, from Old French nimphe, from Latin nympha (“nymph, bride"), from Ancient Greek νύμφη (numphÄ“, “bride").

    From Wiktionary