Fairy definition

fârē
Frequency:
An imaginary being in human form, depicted as clever, mischievous, and possessing magical powers.
noun
10
1
Fairylike; graceful; delicate.
adjective
7
0
(offensive slang) Used as a disparaging term for a gay man.
noun
5
3
Of fairies.
adjective
2
0
(folklore) A being usually in human form and having magic powers, specif. one that is tiny, graceful, and delicate.
noun
2
1
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(Northern England, US, derogatory, colloquial) A male homosexual, especially one who is effeminate.
noun
1
0
The definition of a fairy is a tiny, magical, make-believe human-like creature with wings, or is an offensive slang term of contempt for a male homosexual.

An example of a fairy is Tinker Bell.

noun
0
0
A mythical being who had magical powers, known in many sizes and descriptions, although often depicted in modern illustrations only as small and spritely with gauze-like wings; A sprite.
noun
0
0
(paganism) A nature spirit revered in modern paganism.
noun
0
0
(slang) A male homosexual.
noun
11
12
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
fairy
Plural:
fairies

Origin of fairy

  • Middle English fairie fairyland, enchanted being from Old French faerie from fae fairy from Vulgar Latin Fāta goddess of fate from Latin fāta the Fates pl. of fātum fate fate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • English from ca. 1300, first in the sense of "enchantment, illusion, dream" and later "realm of the fays, fairy-land" or "the inhabitants of fairyland as a collective". The re-interpretation of the term as a countable noun denoting individual inhabitants of fairy-land can be traced to the 1390s, but becomes common only in the 16th century.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English fairie, from Old French faerie, the -erie abstract of fae, from Vulgar Latin Fāta (“goddess of fate”), from Latin fātum (“fate”)

    From Wiktionary