Siren meaning

sīrən
Frequency:
A woman regarded as irresistibly alluring.
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(original sense) (Greek mythology) One of a group of nymphs who lured mariners to their death on the rocks.
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A woman who uses her sexual attractiveness to entice or allure men; a woman who is considered seductive.
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Any of several slender aquatic salamanders of the family Sirenidae of eastern North America, having external gills, small forelimbs, and no hind limbs.
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(greek mythology) One of a group of sea nymphs who by their sweet singing lured mariners to destruction on the rocks surrounding their island.
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A common name for mammals of Sirenia.
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Relating to or like a siren.
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Any of a family (Sirenidae) of slender, eel-shaped salamanders without hind legs; esp., the mud eel.
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A device, either mechanical or electronic, that makes a piercingly loud sound as an alarm or signal, or the sound from such a device.
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A musical instrument, one of the few aerophones in the percussion section of the symphony orchestra.
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A common name for salamanders of Siren and Sirenidae.
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The definition of a siren is a wailing sound made by passing air through a rotating disc, or a beautiful woman who uses sex to attract men, or a mythical female creature that lures men into the sea.

An example of a siren is the sound from a police car as it moves through traffic.

An example of a siren is an adult movie star.

An example of a siren is a mermaid.

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(class. myth.) Any of several sea nymphs, represented as part bird and part woman, who lure sailors to their death on rocky coasts by seductive singing.
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Origin of siren

  • French sirène from Old French sereine Siren from Late Latin Sīrēna from Latin Sīrēn from Greek Seirēn

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English serein from Old French sereine siren

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, itself from Middle French sereine (itself from Late Latin sirena) and from Latin Sīrēn, ultimately from Ancient Greek Σειρήν (Seirēn).

    From Wiktionary