Signal meaning

sĭgnəl
The definition of a signal is a message or means of communicating a message.

An example of a signal is a red light.

noun
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2
Signal means out of the ordinary or remarkable.

An example of signal used as an adjective is the phrase a "signal win" which means a team that usually loses has just won.

adjective
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To signal is defined as to communicate or indicate.

An example of signal is to hold up one finger to mean you'll be there in a minute.

verb
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Something that incites action.

The peace treaty was the signal for celebration.

noun
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2
The sound, image, or message transmitted or received by means of telecommunications.
noun
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2
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To make a signal or signals to.
verb
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A sign or event fixed or understood as the occasion for prearranged combined action.

A bugle signal to attack.

noun
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Anything which occasions a certain action or response.
noun
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In some card games, a bid or play designed to guide one's partner.
noun
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In radio, television, cell phones, etc., the electrical impulses, sound or picture elements, etc. transmitted or received.
noun
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(football) Code words, numbers, etc. called out, esp. by the quarterback, to indicate which play or defense to use next.
noun
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Not average or ordinary; remarkable; notable.
adjective
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Used as a signal or in signaling.
adjective
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To make known or communicate (information) by signals.
verb
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To make a signal or signals.
verb
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(biology) A physical entity, such as a chemical or an electromagnetic wave, that activates a cell receptor and elicits a specific response.
noun
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To cause an effect in a cell by the activation of a receptor, as by a neurotransmitter or hormone.
verb
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A fluctuating quantity or impulse whose variations represent information. The amplitude or frequency of voltage, current, electric field strength, light, and sound can be varied as signals representing information.
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A signal is a pulse or frequency of electricity or light. It can be transmitted in a wire, by fiber or wirelessly. The term is generic and may refer to virtually anything generated and transmitted, including data, control signals and the pulses in an electronic circuit. The term is often used with another word, such as "carrier signal," "data signal" or "control signal." See signal-to-noise ratio and control signal.Signal vs. SignalingA "signal" can refer to a data signal or a control signal, but "signaling" refers to transmitting only control signals. It is very common to hear the term in the telecom industry, where "signaling" means setting up and breaking down a call, but does not refer to the actual pulses or frequencies of the data (voice, text, etc.) itself (see SS7 and signaling).
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An electromagnetic impulse or wave transmitted to convey information in telecommunications, telegraphy, television, radio, radar, etc.
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A sign made to give notice of some occurrence, command, or danger, or to indicate the start of a concerted action.
noun
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An on-off light, semaphore, or other device used to give an indication to another person.
noun
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(of a radio, TV, telephone, internet, etc) An electrical or electromagnetic action, normally a voltage that is a function of time that conveys the information of the radio or TV program or of communication with another party.

My mobile phone can't get a signal in the railway station.

noun
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A token; an indication; a foreshadowing; a sign.
noun
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Useful information, as opposed to noise.
noun
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(computing, Unix) A simple interprocess communication used to notify a process or thread of an occurrence.
noun
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verb
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Standing above others in rank, importance, or achievement.

A signal exploit; a signal service; a signal act of benevolence.

adjective
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Notably out of the ordinary.

A signal feat; a signal event.

adjective
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1
To make a signal to.

I signaled the driver to proceed.

verb
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To relate or make known by signals.

They have signaled their willingness to negotiate.

verb
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To cause an effect in (a cell) by the release of a chemical, such as a neurotransmitter or hormone.
verb
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To make a signal or signals.
verb
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(now rare) A token or indication.
noun
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1

Origin of signal

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin signāle from neuter of Late Latin signālis of a sign from Latin signum sign sign

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French segnal, seignal or Medieval Latin signāle, noun use of the neuter of Late Latin signālis, from Latin signum.

    From Wiktionary