Motion meaning

mōshən
Motion is defined as to signal with a movement.

An example of motion is to wave at someone to invite them over to your table.

verb
19
7
Active operation.

Set the plan in motion.

noun
18
4
The act or process of changing position or place.
noun
16
5
(law) An application made to a court for an order or a ruling.
noun
13
4
The definition of a motion is a movement or a proposal for action.

An example of motion is a waving hand.

An example of motion is a request by a committee member that a recommendation be accepted.

noun
10
8
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A formal proposal put to the vote under parliamentary procedures.
noun
5
0
To direct by making a gesture.

Motioned us to our seats.

verb
4
0
To make a motion (that something should happen).
verb
4
0
To make a meaningful movement of the hand, head, etc.; gesture.
verb
4
1
(rare) The ability to move.
noun
3
0
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An impulse; inclination.

Of one's own motion.

noun
2
0
(law) An application to a court for a ruling, order, etc.
noun
2
0
(mech.) A combination of moving parts; mechanism.
noun
2
0
To direct or command by a meaningful gesture.
verb
2
0
(uncountable) A state of progression from one place to another.
noun
2
0
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(countable) A change of position with respect to time.
noun
2
0
(physics) A change from one place to another.
noun
2
0
(countable) A parliamentary action to propose something.

The motion to amend is now open for discussion.

noun
2
0
To gesture indicating a desired movement.

He motioned for me to come closer.

verb
2
0
(proscribed) To introduce a motion in parliamentary procedure.
verb
2
0
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To make a proposal; to offer plans.

verb
2
0
The ability or power to move.

Lost motion in his arm.

noun
2
1
The manner in which the body moves, as in walking.
noun
2
1
A prompting from within; an impulse or inclination.

Resigned of her own motion.

noun
2
1
(music) Melodic ascent and descent of pitch.
noun
2
1
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To indicate by making a gesture; signal.

Motioned that he was ready.

verb
2
1
To signal by making a gesture.

Motioned to her to enter.

verb
2
1
The act or process of moving; passage of a body from one place to another; movement.
noun
2
1
The act of moving the body or any of its parts.
noun
2
1
A meaningful movement of the hand, eyes, etc.; gesture.
noun
2
1
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A meaningful or expressive change in the position of the body or a part of the body; a gesture.
noun
2
2
A proposal; suggestion; esp., a proposal formally made in an assembly or meeting.
noun
1
1
(music) Melodic progression, as a change from one pitch to another in a voice part.
noun
1
1
In litigation, a formal request, usually in writing, to a court for specified relief, under applicable procedural rules.
noun
1
1
In a legislature or other deliberative body, a request for procedural relief made by a member to the chairman or the body at large, under Robert’s Rules of Order or other applicable procedural rules.
noun
1
1
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(philosophy) From κίνησις; any change. Traditionally of four types: generation and corruption, alteration, augmentation and diminution, and change of place.
noun
1
1
Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.
noun
1
1
(law) An application made to a court or judge orally in open court. Its object is to obtain an order or rule directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant.

noun
1
1
(music) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. (Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is when parts move in the same direction.)
noun
1
1
go through the motions
  • To do something in a mechanical manner indicative of a lack of interest or involvement.
idiom
1
1
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go through the motions
  • to do something from habit or according to formalities, but without enthusiasm, personal involvement, etc.
idiom
1
1
in motion
  • moving; traveling or in operation
idiom
1
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of motion

  • Middle English mocioun from Old French motion from Latin mōtiō mōtiōn- from mōtus past participle of movēre to move meuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman motion, mocion, Middle French motion, and their source, Latin motio (“movement, motion").

    From Wiktionary