Inertia definition

ĭ-nûrshə
(physics) The tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest or of a body in straight line motion to stay in motion in a straight line unless acted on by an outside force; the resistance of a body to changes in momentum.
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Resistance or disinclination to motion, action, or change.

An entrenched bureaucracy's inertia.

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A tendency to remain in a fixed condition without change; disinclination to move or act.
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(physics) The tendency of matter to remain at rest if at rest, or, if moving, to keep moving in the same direction, unless affected by some outside force.
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The resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Because of inertia, a body at rest remains at rest, and a body in motion continues moving in a straight line and at a constant speed, unless a force is applied to it. Mass can be considered a measure of a body's inertia.
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The more inertia an object has, the less the object will change its motion when it meets another force.
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The ground is the force, the motion, that causes the object to no longer have inertia and to instead stray from its speed and direction.

An example of inertia is a bowling ball sitting still on a shelf.

An example of inertia is a person walking in a straight line down the street.

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The definition of inertia is when an object remains still or moves in a constant direction at a constant speed.
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Inertia will continue unless the object meets some external force.
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(physics, uncountable or countable) The property of a body that resists any change to its uniform motion; equivalent to its mass.
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(figuratively) In a person, unwillingness to take action.
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(medicine) Lack of activity; sluggishness; said especially of the uterus, when, in labour, its contractions have nearly or wholly ceased.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
inertia
Plural:
inerti, inertias

Origin of inertia

  • Latin idleness from iners inert- inert inert

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin inertia (“lack of art or skill, inactivity, indolence”), from iners (“unskilled, inactive”), from in- (“without, not”) + ars (“skill, art”).

    From Wiktionary