Energy definition

ĕnər-jē
Frequency:
The capacity for work or vigorous activity.

Who has the energy to climb that trail?

noun
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Energy is defined as the capacity for activity or the exertion of power.

An example of energy is a person being able to run five miles just after waking up.

An example of energy is what is created by a wind turbine.

noun
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Usable heat or power.

Each year Americans consume a high percentage of the world's energy.

noun
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The capacity to do work.
noun
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(New Age jargon) An intangible, modifiable force (often characterized as either 'positive' or 'negative') believed to emanate from a person, place or thing and which is (can be) preserved and transferred in human interactions; shared mood or group habit; a vibe, a feeling, an impression.
noun
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The capacity or power to do work, such as the capacity to move an object (of a given mass) by the application of force. Energy can exist in a variety of forms, such as electrical, mechanical, chemical, thermal, or nuclear, and can be transformed from one form to another. It is measured by the amount of work done, usually in joules or watts.
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Exertion of vigor or power.

A project requiring a great deal of time and energy; devoted her energies to writing songs.

noun
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Vitality and intensity of expression.

A speech delivered with energy and emotion.

noun
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(informal) A nonphysical force or quality perceived as inhering in a particular place, person, or situation.

Was turned off by the group's negative energy.

noun
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A source of usable power, such as petroleum or coal.
noun
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The capacity of a physical system to do work.
noun
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A form, amount, or level of this capacity.
noun
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(physics) The capacity for doing work.
noun
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Such forces or power, esp. in action.

To apply all one's energies.

noun
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Those resources, as petroleum, coal, gas, wind, nuclear fuel, and sunlight, from which energy in the form of electricity, heat, etc. can be produced.
noun
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The available supply of such usable resources.

An energy shortage.

noun
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In physics, the capacity of a system for doing work. It took a lot of energy to write this book. (Take my word for it, so to speak.) See also physics.
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The impetus behind all motion and all activity.
noun
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(physics) A quantity that denotes the ability to do work and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance²/time² (ML²/T²) or the equivalent.

Units:SI: joule (J), kilowatt-hour (kW·h)CGS: erg (erg)Customary: foot-pound-force, calorie, kilocalorie (i.e. dietary calories), BTU, liter-atmosphere, ton of TNT.

noun
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In physics, referring to a source of energy, electrical, mechanical, or otherwise.
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Potential forces; inherent power; capacity for vigorous action.
noun
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Force of expression or utterance.
noun
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Strength or power efficiently exerted.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
energy
Plural:
energies

Origin of energy

  • French énergie from Late Latin energīa from Greek energeia from energos active en- in, at en–2 ergon work werg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French énergie, from Late Latin energia, from Ancient Greek ἐνέργεια (energeia, “action, act, work”), from ἐνεργός (energos, “active”), from ἐν (en, “in”) + ἔργον (ergon, “work”).

    From Wiktionary