Wink meaning

wĭngk
To close and open the eyelid of one eye deliberately, as to convey a message, signal, or suggestion.
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Wink is defined as to quickly open and close the eyes, especially one eye while keeping the other open.

An example of wink is how a person could flirt with someone across a crowded room.

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To close and open the eyelids of both eyes; blink.
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To shine fitfully; twinkle.

Harbor lights were winking in the distance.

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To close and open (an eye or the eyes) rapidly.
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To signal or express by winking.

Winked his agreement.

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The very brief time required for a wink; an instant.
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A quick closing and opening of the eyelids; a blink.
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A gleam or twinkle.
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A brief period of sleep.
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To close the eyelids and open them again quickly.
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To shine intermittently; twinkle.
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To make (the eyes or an eye) wink.
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To move, remove, etc. by winking.

To wink back tears.

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To signal or express by winking.
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The act of winking.
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A signal, hint, etc. given by winking.
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A twinkle or twinkling.
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(1) See Wink hub.
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Tillotson.

They are not blind, but they wink.

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(archaic, intransitive) To turn a blind eye.
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(intransitive) To blink with only one eye as a message, signal, or suggestion.

He winked at me.

She winked her eye.

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(intransitive) To twinkle.
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(intransitive) To be dim and flicker.

The light winks.

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To send an indication of agreement by winking.
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An act of winking (a blinking of only one eye), or a message sent by winking.
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A brief period of sleep; especially forty winks.
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A disc used in the game of tiddlywinks.
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wink at
  • To pretend not to see, as in connivance.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

wink at

Origin of wink

  • Middle English winken to close one's eyes from Old English wincian
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English winken (strong verb) and Middle English winken (weak verb), from Old English *wincan (strong verb) and wincian (“to wink, make a sign, close the eyes, blink", weak verb), from Proto-Germanic *winkanÄ… (“to move side to side, sway"), *winkōnÄ… (“to close one's eyes"), from Proto-Indo-European *weng- (“to bow, bend, arch, curve"). Cognate with Middle Low German winken (“to blink, wink"), German winken (“to nod, beckon, make a sign"). Related also to East Frisian wäänke, Dutch wenken (“to beckon, motion"), Latin vacillare (“sway"), Lithuanian véngti (“to swerve, avoid"), Albanian vang (“tire, felloe"), Sanskrit [script?] (vañcati, “he swaggers"). [Devanagari?]
    From Wiktionary