Tick meaning

tĭk
Any of various usually wingless insects that resemble a tick, such as a sheep ked.
noun
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To function characteristically or well; operate; work.

What makes him tick?

verb
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A cloth case or covering that is filled with cotton, feathers, hair, etc. to form a mattress or pillow.
noun
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The minimum price movement on a futures contract. If the tick is up, it is called an uptick; if it is down, it is called a downtick.
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To tick means to create a consistent noise or beat.

An example of to tick is for a clock to make a noise every second.

verb
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The definition of a tick is a recurring noise.

An example of a tick is the sound of a watch or clock.

noun
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A moment.
noun
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A light mark used to check off or call attention to an item.
noun
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A unit on a scale; a degree.

When interest rates move up a tick.

noun
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To emit recurring clicking sounds.

As the clock ticked.

verb
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To function characteristically or well.

Machines ticking away; curious about what makes people tick.

verb
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To count or record with the sound of ticks.

A clock ticking the hours; a taxi meter ticking the fare.

verb
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To mark or check off (a listed item) with a tick.

Ticked off each name on the list.

verb
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Any of various small bloodsucking arachnids of the order Ixodida that are parasitic on terrestrial vertebrates. Many species transmit diseases, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease.
noun
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Ticking.
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Credit or an amount of credit.
noun
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A light touch; pat.
noun
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A light clicking or tapping sound, as that made by the escapement of a watch or clock.
noun
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A mark (✓, /, etc.) made to check off items; check mark.
noun
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Moment; instant.
noun
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A tiny degree or increment.
noun
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To make a tick or series of ticks, as a clock.
verb
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To indicate, record, or count by a tick or ticks.
verb
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To mark or check off (an item on a list, etc.) with a tick.
verb
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Any of a superfamily (Ixodoidea, order Parasitiformes) of wingless, bloodsucking mites, including many species that transmit diseases and are usually parasitic on humans, cattle, sheep, etc.
noun
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Any of various wingless, parasitic insects.
noun
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noun
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Credit; trust.

To buy something on tick.

noun
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Any of various small bloodsucking arachnids of the order Ixodida that are parasitic on terrestrial vertebrates. Many species transmit diseases, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease.
noun
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Any of various usually wingless insects that resemble a tick, such as a sheep ked.
noun
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Any of numerous small, parasitic arachnids of the suborder Ixodida that feed on the blood of animals. Like their close relatives the mites and unlike spiders, ticks have no division between cephalothorax and abdomen. Ticks differ from mites by being generally larger and having a sensory pit at the end of their first pair of legs. Many ticks transmit febrile diseases, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease.
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One clock cycle, or one "tick" of the clock. See clock cycle.
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(fauna) A tiny woodland arthropod of the order Acarina.
noun
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A relatively quiet but sharp sound generally made repeatedly by moving machinery.

The steady tick of the clock provided a comforting background for the conversation.

noun
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A mark on any scale of measurement; a unit of measurement.

At midday, the long bond is up a tick.

noun
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(computing) A jiffy (unit of time defined by basic timer frequency).
noun
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(colloquial) A short period of time, particularly a second.

I'll be back in a tick.

noun
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(Australia, New Zealand, UK) A mark (✓) made to indicate agreement, correctness or acknowledgement; checkmark.

Indicate that you are willing to receive marketing material by putting a tick in the box.

noun
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To make a clicking noise similar to the movement of the hands in an analog clock.
verb
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To make a tick mark.
verb
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(informal) To work or operate, especially mechanically.

He took the computer apart to see how it ticked.

I wonder what makes her tick.

verb
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To strike gently; to pat.
verb
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(uncountable) Ticking.
noun
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A sheet that wraps around a mattress; the cover of a mattress, containing the filling.
noun
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(UK, colloquial) Credit, trust.
noun
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To go on trust, or credit.
verb
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To give tick; to trust.
verb
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
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A light, sharp, clicking sound made repeatedly by a machine, such as a clock.
noun
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tick off
  • To reprimand.
  • To make angry or irritable.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of tick

  • Middle English tikke probably from Middle Dutch tīke ultimately from Latin thēca receptacle from Greek thēkē dhē- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tike, tik perhaps from Old English ticca
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English tik light tap
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Short for ticket
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English ticia (“parasitic animal"), from West Germanic, compare Dutch teek, German Zecke.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English tike, probably from Middle Dutch, from Latin theca (“cover")
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English tek (“light touch", "tap")
    From Wiktionary
  • From ticket
    From Wiktionary