Beat meaning

bēt
To beat is to win, or to arrive first for something.

An example of beat is to win a game of checkers against an opponent.

An example of beat is to arrive first at the finish line in a race.

verb
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To mix rapidly with a utensil.

Beat two eggs in a bowl.

verb
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A member of the Beat Generation.
noun
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(informal) Worn-out; fatigued.
adjective
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(informal) To cheat or trick.
verb
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Any of a series of movements or sounds; throb.
noun
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(informal) To be superior to or better than.

Riding beats walking.

verb
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(radio) One cycle of a frequency formed by beating.
noun
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Of or belonging to a group of young persons, esp. of the 1950s, rebelling against conventional attitudes, dress, speech, etc., largely as an expression of social disillusionment.
adjective
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A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.
noun
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(slang) To perplex or baffle.

It beats me; I don't know the answer.

verb
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To inflict repeated blows.
verb
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To shine or glare intensely.

The sun beat down on us all day.

verb
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A pattern of stress that produces the rhythm of verse.
noun
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A variable unit of time measuring a pause taken by an actor, as for dramatic effect.
noun
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Of or relating to the Beat Generation.
adjective
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To hit or strike repeatedly; pound.
verb
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To punish by striking repeatedly and hard; whip, flog, spank, etc.
verb
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To dash repeatedly against.

Waves beat the shore.

verb
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To shape or flatten by hammering; forge.
verb
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To mix by stirring or striking repeatedly with a utensil; whip (an egg, cream, etc.)
verb
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To move (esp. wings) up and down; flap; flail.
verb
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To hunt through; search.

The posse beat the countryside for the fugitive.

verb
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To mark (time or rhythm) by tapping, etc.
verb
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To sound or signal, as by a drumbeat.
verb
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(informal) To baffle or puzzle.
verb
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To strike, hit, or dash repeatedly and, usually, hard.
verb
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To move or sound rhythmically; throb, pulsate, vibrate, tick, etc.
verb
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To strike about in or hunt through underbrush, woods, etc. for game.
verb
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To take beating or stirring.

This cream doesn't beat well.

verb
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(informal) To win.
verb
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(naut.) To progress by tacking into the wind.
verb
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(radio) To combine two waves of different frequencies, thus producing an additional frequency equal to the difference between these.
verb
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A beating, as of the heart.
noun
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Any of a series of blows or strokes.
noun
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(informal) A person or thing that surpasses.

You never saw the beat of it.

noun
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(acoustics) The regularly recurring fluctuation in loudness of sound produced by two simultaneous tones of nearly equal frequency.
noun
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(ballet) A movement in which one leg is brought in contact with the other or both legs are brought together in the air.
noun
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(journalism) A reporting of a news item ahead of all rivals; scoop.
noun
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(naut.) A tack into the wind.
noun
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(informal) Tired out; exhausted, physically or emotionally.
adjective
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A fluctuation or pulsation, usually repeated, in the amplitude of a signal. Beats are generally produced by the superposition of two waves of different frequencies; if the signals are audible, this results in fluctuations between louder and quieter sound.
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A stroke; a blow.
noun
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noun
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(music) A transient grace note, struck immediately before the one it is intended to ornament.
noun
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The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency.
noun
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A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect.
noun
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The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.

To walk the beat.

noun
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(by extension) An area of a person's responsibility, especially.
  • In journalism, the primary focus of a reporter's stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).
noun
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(dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.
noun
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(archaic) A low cheat or swindler.

A dead beat.

noun
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The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.
noun
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To hit; to knock; to pound; to strike.

As soon as she heard that Wiktionary was shutting down, she went into a rage and beat the wall with her fists until her knuckles bled.

verb
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To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.

He danced hypnotically while she beat the atabaque.

verb
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(intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.
verb
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(intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.
verb
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To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do better than, outdo, or excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.

Jan had little trouble beating John in tennis. He lost five games in a row.

No matter how quickly Joe finished his test, Roger always beat him.

I just can't seem to beat the last level of this video game.

verb
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(intransitive, nautical) To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.
verb
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To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.
verb
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To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.

Beat the eggs and whip the cream.

verb
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(UK, In haggling for a price) Of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price.

He wanted $50 for it, but I managed to beat him down to $35.

verb
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(nonstandard) Past participle of beat.
verb
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To indicate by beating or drumming.

To beat a retreat; to beat to quarters.

verb
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To tread, as a path.
verb
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To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.
verb
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To be in agitation or doubt.
verb
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To make a sound when struck.

The drums beat.

verb
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(military, intransitive) To make a succession of strokes on a drum.

The drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters.

verb
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To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.
verb
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(US slang) Exhausted.

After the long day, she was feeling completely beat.

adjective
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Dilapidated, beat up.

Dude, you drive a beat car like that and you ain’t gonna get no honeys.

adjective
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(gay slang) Fabulous.

Her makeup was beat!

adjective
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(slang) Boring.
adjective
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(slang, of a person) Ugly.
adjective
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noun
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To pulsate; throb.
verb
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To flap repeatedly.
verb
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To fall in torrents.

The rain beat on the roof.

verb
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To hunt through woods or underbrush in search of game.
verb
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(nautical) To sail in the direction from which the wind blows.
verb
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A stroke or blow, especially one that produces a sound or serves as a signal.
noun
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A pulsation or throb.
noun
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(physics) A variation in the amplitude of a wave, especially that which results from the superpositioning of two or more waves of different frequencies. When sound waves are combined, the beat is heard as a pulsation in the sound.
noun
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To make, force, or drive by or as by hitting, flailing, or pounding.

To beat one's way through a crowd, to beat chalk dust from erasers.

verb
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(slang) To avoid the penalties associated with (a charge, indictment, etc.); escape (a rap)
verb
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A beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse.

noun
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Beat is defined as a rhythmic movement, or is the speed at which a piece of music is played.

An example of beat is the beating of a heart.

An example of beat is the rhythmic noise played on a drum.

An example of a beat is the tempo at which a conductor leads an orchestra to play.

noun
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The definition of beat is someone or something that is extremely tired and/or worn out.

An example of beat is a person who has just worked 16 hours on his feet.

adjective
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Beat means to hit something over and over again or to form or mix something.

An example of beat is to hit a rug with a stick in order to get the dirt out.

An example of beat is to tap a drum.

An example of beat is to stir heavy cream rapidly, turning it into whipped cream.

An example of beat is to walk repeatedly through the snow from the house to the garage, resulting in a walkway being created.

verb
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(physics) To cause a reference wave to combine with (a second wave) so that the frequency of the second wave can be studied through time variations in the amplitude of the combination.
verb
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beat all
  • To be impressive or amazing. Often used in negative conditional constructions:
    If that doesn't beat all!.
idiom
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beat a retreat
  • To make a hasty withdrawal.
idiom
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beat around
  • To fail to confront a subject directly.
idiom
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(slang) beat it
  • To leave hurriedly.
idiom
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beat the bushes
  • To make an exhaustive search.
idiom
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beat the drum
  • To give enthusiastic public support or promotion:
    A politician who beats the drum for liberalism.
idiom
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beat up on
  • To attack physically.
  • To criticize or scold harshly.
idiom
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to beat the band
  • To an extreme degree.
idiom
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beat about
  • to hunt or look through or around
idiom
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beat back
  • to force to retreat; drive back
idiom
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beat down
  • to shine steadily with dazzling light and intense heat, as the sun
  • to put down; suppress
  • to force to a lower price
idiom
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beat it!
  • go away!
idiom
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beat off
  • to drive back; repel
  • to masturbate
idiom
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beat one's meat
  • to masturbate
idiom
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beat out
  • to reach first base safely on (a bunt or grounder), as before an infielder's throw
idiom
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beat up (on)
  • to give a beating to; thrash
idiom
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on the beat
  • in tempo
idiom
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to beat the band
  • with great energy and vigor; fast and furiously
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of beat

  • Middle English beten from Old English bēaten bhau- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English beten, from Old English bēatan (“to beat, pound, strike, lash, dash, thrust, hurt, injure”), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (“to push, strike”) (compare Low German boten, German boßen, Old Norse bauta), from Proto-Indo-European *bhau- (compare Old Irish fo·botha (“he threatened”), Latin confutō (“I strike down”), fūstis (“stick, club”), Albanian bahe (“sling”), Lithuanian baudžiù, Bulgarian бутам (butam, “I beat, knock”), Old Armenian բութ (butʿ)). Compare Occitan batre, French battre.

    From Wiktionary

  • From beatnik

    From Wiktionary