Whisk meaning

wĭsk, hwĭsk

With a quick whisk, she swept the cat from the pantry with her broom.

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A kind of cape, forming part of a woman's dress.
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To whisk is defined as to move something or someone very quickly, or to beat or mix foods using a special kitchen tool, also called a whisk.

An example of whisk is when you quickly clear away clutter.

An example of whisk is when you beat eggs before you scramble them.

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The definition of a whisk is a kitchen action where you mix in a quick sweeping motion or a gadget with wire loops.

An example of a whisk is a kitchen gadget you use to mix eggs before you scramble them.

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To move or cause to move with quick light sweeping motions.

Whisked crumbs off the table; whisked the children away.

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To whip (eggs or cream).
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To move lightly, nimbly, and rapidly.
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A quick light sweeping motion.
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A whiskbroom.
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A small bunch, as of twigs or hair, attached to a handle and used in brushing.
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A kitchen utensil, usually in the form of stiff, thin wire loops attached to a handle, used for whipping foodstuffs.
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A small bunch of straw, twigs, hair, etc. used for brushing.
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A kitchen utensil consisting of wire loops fixed in a handle, for whipping egg whites, cream, etc.
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To move, remove, carry, brush (away, off, out, etc.) forcefully and speedily, as with a quick, sweeping motion.

To whisk out a handkerchief, to whisk off crumbs.

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To whip (egg whites, cream, etc.)
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To move quickly, nimbly, or briskly.
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A kitchen utensil, made from stiff wire loops fixed to a handle, used for whipping (a mechanical device with the same function).

He used a whisk to whip up a light and airy souffle.

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A bunch of twigs or hair etc, used as a brush.

Peter dipped the whisk in lather and applied it to his face, so he could start shaving.

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A small handheld broom with a small (no) handle.

I used a whisk to sweep the counter, then a push-broom for the floor.

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A plane used by coopers for evening chines.
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(archaic) An impertinent fellow.

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To move something with quick light sweeping motions.

Vernon whisked the sawdust from his workbench.

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In cooking, to whip e.g. eggs or cream.

The chef prepared to whisk the egg whites for the angel's food cake.

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To move something rapidly and with no warning.

The governess whisked the children from the room before they could see their presents.

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(intransitive) To move lightly and nimbly.

The children whisked down the road to the fair, laughing and chattering as they went.

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(obsolete) The card game whist.

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Origin of whisk

  • Middle English wisken of Scandinavian origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English, from Old Norse visk (compare Danish visk), from Proto-Germanic *wisk- 'move quickly' (compare Old English wiscian 'to plait', granwisc 'awn', Dutch wis 'wisp', German Wisch), from Proto-Indo-European *u̯eis (compare Latin virga 'rod, switch', viscus 'entrails', Lithuanian vizgéti 'to tremble', Czech vechet 'wisp of straw', Sanskrit veÅŸka 'noose').
    From Wiktionary