Switch meaning

swĭch
The definition of a switch is a device used to make or break a connection in a circuit so you an turn power on and off to something, or a change in attitude or policy.

An example of a switch is the switch on the wall you use to turn your light on and off.

An example of a switch is when you are religious and you then decide to give up your religion, making a major lifestyle change.

noun
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To jerk or swing sharply; lash.

A cow switching its tail.

verb
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To make or undergo a shift or an exchange.

The office has switched to shorter summer hours.

verb
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To swish sharply from side to side.
verb
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A shift, transference, or change, esp. if sudden or unexpected.
noun
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To whip or beat with or as with a switch.
verb
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To shift; transfer; change; turn aside; divert.
verb
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To transfer (a railroad train or car) from one set of tracks to another by use of a switch; shunt.
verb
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To change or exchange.

To switch places.

verb
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To move (rolling stock) from one track to another; shunt.
verb
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To move from or as from one set of tracks to another.
verb
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To shift; transfer; change.
verb
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To swing sharply; lash.
verb
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(1) In programming, a bit or byte used to keep track of some event. The term is sometimes synonymous with the branch command.
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A mechanical, electromechanical, or electronic device that opens, closes, or changes the connections in an electrical circuit.
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A device that establishes, maintains, and changes logical connections over physical circuits. Switches flexibly connect transmitters and receivers across networks of interconnected links, thereby allowing network resources to be shared by large numbers of end users. Without switches, each transmitter/receiver pair would require a dedicated circuit in order to transfer data. There are a number of types of switches. In terms of switching technology, there are circuit switches and packet switches. a. Circuit switches establish connections between circuits, on demand and as available. Those connections are temporary, continuous, and exclusive in nature. Circuit switches were developed for voice communications, but will support any type of information transfer. Common examples of circuit switches include private branch exchanges (PBXs) and central office exchanges (COs or COEs). b. Packet switches switch data organized into packets, discrete sets of data that may take the specific form of packets, frames, or cells depending on the network technology specifics. For example, packet switches switch packets in networks based on the Internet Protocol (IP), frames in networks based on the frame relay or Ethernet protocols, and cells in those based on the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) protocol. Packet switches were initially developed for data networking, but can support other forms of data, as well, although with varying degrees of success. With respect to physical placement, there are edge switches and core switches. c. Edge switches are positioned at the physical edge of a public network.The user organization gains access to an edge switch via an access link, or local loop. A central office (CO) is an example of an edge switch in the context of the circuit-switched public switched telephone network (PSTN). In a Local Area Network (LAN), a workgroup switch is the equivalent of an edge switch in a public network. d. Core switches, also known as tandem switches and backbone switches, are high-capacity switches positioned in the physical core, or backbone, of a network and serving to interconnect edge switches. Although switches can be very intelligent in many respects, they operate only at the Layer 2, the Data Link Layer of the OSI Reference Model.That is to say that they operate link-by-link, or hop-by-hop, generally under the control of a centralized set of logic that can coordinate their activities in order to establish end-to-end connectivity across a multi-link circuit.A switch has no concept of the network as a whole, from end-to-end. See also ATM, backbone switch, cell, CO, core switch, Data Link Layer, edge switch, Ethernet, frame, frame relay, IP, LAN switch, OSI Reference Model, PSTN, router, and tandem switch.
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A network device joining many systems together at a low-level layer of the network protocol. The most widely used Ethernet switches operate at the second layer (Data Link Layer) of the OSI model and look like hubs. Switches have more “intelligence” than hubs, however, and are therefore more costly. Unlike hubs, switches can inspect data packets as they are received, they can determine both the source and the destination device of the packet, and they can then forward the packet correctly. By delivering messages to only the connected device for which it was intended, network switches save network bandwidth and offer typically better performance than hubs can. Network switches offer varying port configurations, beginning with 4-port or 5-port models and going up to stackable core infrastructure switches with several hundred ports. They support 10 Mbps Ethernet, 100 Mbps Ethernet, and 1GBit/s Ethernet, or all three. About, Inc. Switch. [Online, 2004.] About, Inc. Website. http://compnet working.about.com/library/glossary/bldef-switch.htm.
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A device to turn electric current on and off or direct its flow.
noun
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noun
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(rail transport, US) A movable section of railroad track which allows the train to be directed down one of two destination tracks; point.
noun
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A slender woody plant stem used as a whip; a thin, flexible rod.
noun
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(computer science) A command line notation allowing specification of optional behavior.

Use the /b switch to specify black-and-white printing.

noun
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(computing, programming) A programming construct that takes different actions depending on the value of an expression.
noun
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(computing, networking) A networking device connecting multiple wires, allowing them to communicate simultaneously, when possible. Compare to the less efficient hub device that solely duplicates network packets to each wire.
noun
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(telecommunications) A system of specialized relays, computer hardware, or other equipment which allows the interconnection of a calling party's telephone line with any called party's line.
noun
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(BDSM) One who is willing to take either a sadistic or a masochistic role.
noun
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A separate mass or tress of hair, or of some substance (such as jute) made to resemble hair, formerly worn on the head by women.
noun
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I want to switch this red dress for a green one.

verb
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To change (something) to the specified state using a switch.

Switch the light on.

verb
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To whip or hit with a switch.
verb
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(intransitive) To change places, tasks, etc.

I want to switch to a different seat.

verb
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(slang, intransitive) To get angry suddenly; to quickly or unreasonably become enraged.
verb
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To swing or whisk.

To switch a cane.

verb
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To trim.

To switch a hedge.

verb
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To turn from one railway track to another; to transfer by a switch; generally with off, from, etc.

To switch off a train; to switch a car from one track to another.

verb
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(ecclesiastical) To shift to another circuit.
verb
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(snowboarding) Riding with their opposite foot forward from their natural position.
adjective
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To switch is to make a change, such as altering a direction, changing one thing for another or adopting a new policy.

When you are wearing a red shirt and you change into a blue shirt, this is an example of a situation where you switch your shirt.

verb
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A thin, flexible twig, rod, stick, etc., esp. one used for whipping.
noun
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The bushy part of the tail in some animals, as the cow.
noun
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A separate tress or plait of natural or synthetic hair bound at one end and used by women as part of a coiffure.
noun
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An abrupt, sharp, lashing movement, as with a switch.
noun
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A device that controls the flow of current in an electric circuit, esp. by turning the current on or off or diverting it to a particular part of the circuit.
noun
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Origin of switch

  • Probably of Low German or Flemish origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from Middle Dutch swijch twig.

    From Wiktionary

  • First known use: c.1592

    From Wiktionary