Dub meaning

dŭb
Dub is slang for a clumsy person.

An example of a dub is someone who always falls.

noun
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1
The act of dubbing.
noun
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1
A mostly instrumental style of music originating in Jamaica, produced by remixing existing recordings to emphasize drum and bass rhythms and adding audio effects.
noun
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1
To confer knighthood on by tapping on the shoulder with a sword.
verb
2
1
Dub is defined as to give a title or rank to, or to add a soundtrack in a film.

An example of dub is to make someone a knight.

An example of dub is to replace a French soundtrack in a movie with an English soundtrack.

verb
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To honor with a new title or description.
verb
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2
A puddle or small pool.
noun
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2
To tap lightly on the shoulder by way of conferring knighthood.
verb
1
1
To give a name to facetiously or playfully; nickname.
verb
1
1
To strike, cut, or rub (timber or leather, for example) so as to make even or smooth.
verb
1
1
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To dress (a fowl).
verb
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1
To execute (a golf stroke, for example) poorly.
verb
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1
An awkward person or player; a bungler.
noun
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1
To beat (a drum).
verb
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To make a thrust.
verb
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1
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A drumbeat.
noun
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1
To insert a new soundtrack, often a synchronized translation of the original dialogue, into (a film).
verb
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To add (sound) into a film or tape.

Dub in strings behind the vocal.

verb
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The new sounds added by dubbing.
noun
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A dubbed copy of a tape or record.
noun
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1
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(obs.) To hit; strike.
verb
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1
To make (wood, etc.) smooth, as by hammering or scraping.
verb
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To dress (leather) by rubbing.
verb
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1
(slang) To bungle (a golf stroke, etc.)
verb
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1
(slang) A clumsy, unskillful person.
noun
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1
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To rerecord the sound from (an old recording)
verb
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To provide with a soundtrack.
verb
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To insert in (a film) a soundtrack with synchronized dialogue in another language.
verb
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Dialogue, music, etc. inserted in a film's soundtrack.
noun
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A copy of a recording made for testing the sound or content.
noun
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1
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(scot., north eng.) A small pool or puddle.
noun
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A form of reggae produced by remixing original recordings with overdubbed sound effects, spoken words, fragments of other music, etc.
noun
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1
To add or overlay sound onto an existing audio track or video in a post production environment. For example, additional instruments or voices can be mixed in with the original sound tracks of a song. See also dub-dub-dub.
0
1
To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with the sword.
verb
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1
To name, to entitle, to call.
verb
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1
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To deem.
verb
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To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
verb
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To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
  • To dress with an adze.
    To dub a stick of timber smooth.
  • To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
  • To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
  • To dress a fishing fly.
verb
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To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.
verb
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To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
verb
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1
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To copy the audio track onto a film.
verb
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1
To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation.
verb
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1
To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
verb
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1
(music) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
noun
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1
(music) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
noun
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1
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(music) A growing trend of music from 2009 to current in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
noun
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1
(slang) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
noun
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1
(UK, dialect) A pool or puddle.

noun
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1
(slang) A twenty dollar sack of marijuana.
noun
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1
(slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.
noun
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(rare) A blow.

noun
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1
To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
verb
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1
To thrust at; poke.
verb
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To beat on a drum.
verb
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2
dub in
  • to insert (dialogue, music, etc.) in the soundtrack
idiom
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1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

dub in

Origin of dub

  • Middle English dubben from Old English dubbian perhaps from Old French aduber

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from Low German dubben to hit, strike

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for double

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From a Late Old English (11th century) word dubban (“to knight by striking with a sword”) perhaps borrowed from Old French aduber, adober "equip with arms; adorn" (also 11th century, Modern French adouber), of uncertain origin, but possibly from a Frankish *dubban, cognate with Icelandic dubba (dubba til riddara). Compare also drub for an English reflex of the Germanic word.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare Irish dobhar (“water”), Welsh dŵr (“water”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From shortening of double dime (“twenty”).

    From Wiktionary

  • The modern sense of "to name" is from the 1590s.

    From Wiktionary

  • From a shortening of the word double.

    From Wiktionary