Thesis meaning

thē'sĭs
A hypothetical proposition, especially one put forth without proof.
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A proposition that is maintained by argument.
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A dissertation advancing an original point of view as a result of research, especially as a requirement for an academic degree.
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The first stage of the Hegelian dialectic process.
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The accented section of a measure.
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A proposition maintained or defended in argument, formerly one publicly disputed by a candidate for a degree in a medieval university.
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A formal and lengthy research paper, esp. a work of original research written in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree.
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An unproved statement assumed as a premise.
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In Hegelian philosophy, the initial, least adequate phase of development in dialectic.
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A statement supported by arguments.
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The definition of a thesis is a proposal or suggestion that is maintained by an argument.

An example of thesis is a research paper on why the United States should legalize marijuana.

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A written essay, especially one submitted for a university degree.
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(logic) An affirmation, or distinction from a supposition or hypothesis.
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(music) The accented part of the measure, expressed by the downward beat; the opposite of arsis.
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(poetry) The depression of the voice in pronouncing the syllables of a word.
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(poetry) The part of the metrical foot upon which such a depression falls.
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Origin of thesis

  • Latin from Greek from tithenai to put dhē- in Indo-European roots Senses 5 and 6, Middle English from Late Latin lowering of the voice from Greek downbeat
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin thesis, from Ancient Greek θέσις (thesis, “a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody")
    From Wiktionary