Premise meaning

prĕmĭs
A proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn.
noun
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2
The definition of a premise is a previous statement that an argument is based or how an outcome was decided.

An example of premise is a couple seeing a movie chosen by one, because they saw a movie chosen by the other last week.

noun
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3
(logic) Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.
noun
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1
A prior statement upon which a conclusion is deduced.
noun
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1
To state as a premise.
verb
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3
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A piece of real estate; house or building and its land.

Keep off the premises.

noun
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To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows.
verb
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To provide a basis for; base.
verb
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To state or assume as a proposition in an argument.
verb
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To state in advance as an introduction or explanation.
verb
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To introduce or preface (a discourse, etc.)
verb
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To make a premise.
verb
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An assumption, proposition, or presupposition that serves as the basis for an argument. The word is often confused with premises. For example, CPE is the initialism for Customer Premises Equipment, which is equipment physically located on the customer premises -- at least that is the premise. See also premises.
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A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.
noun
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(usually in the plural, law) Matters previously stated or set forth; especially, that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.
noun
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(usually in the plural) A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts (in this sense, used most often in the plural form).

Trespass on another's premises.

noun
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To state or assume something as a proposition to an argument.
verb
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To make a premise.
verb
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To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously.
verb
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Origin of premise

  • Middle English premisse from Old French from Medieval Latin praemissa (propositiō) (the proposition) put before, premise from Latin feminine past participle of praemittere to set in front prae- pre- mittere to send

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French premisse, from Medieval Latin premissa (“set before") (premissa propositio (“the proposition set before")), feminine past participle of Latin premittere (“to send or put before"), from pre- (“before") + mittere (“to send").

    From Wiktionary