Suppose meaning

sə-pōz
To suppose is to assume something without conviction or to assume something without full understanding or knowledge.

An example of suppose is when you agree to go to a party you don't really want to attend by saying you guess you will go.

An example of suppose is when you put forth a possible theory that hasn't been confirmed.

verb
6
1
To take for granted; to conclude, with less than absolute supporting data; to believe.

Suppose that A implies B and B implies C. Then A implies C.

verb
6
1
To assume to be true or real for the sake of argument or explanation.

Suppose we win the lottery.

verb
4
0
To consider as a suggestion.

Suppose we dine together.

verb
3
0
To imagine; conjecture.
verb
3
0
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To believe, think, guess, etc.

I suppose you're right.

verb
2
0
To imply as an antecedent condition; presuppose.
verb
1
0
To assume to be true, as for the sake of argument or to illustrate a proof.

Suppose A equals B.

verb
1
0
verb
1
0
To consider as a proposed or suggested possibility.

Suppose they don't come.

verb
1
0
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To put by fraud in the place of another.
verb
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0
To expect or obligate.

You're supposed to telephone.

verb
0
1
To make a supposition; conjecture.
verb
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1

I suppose we all agree that this is the best solution.

verb
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1
To imagine; to believe; to receive as true.
verb
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1
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To require to exist or to be true; to imply by the laws of thought or of nature.

Purpose supposes foresight.

verb
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1

Origin of suppose

  • Middle English supposen from Old French supposer alteration (influenced by poser to place) of Medieval Latin suppōnere from Latin to put under sub- sub- pōnere to place apo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French supposer; prefix sub- under + poser to place; - corresponding in meaning to Latin supponere, suppositum, to put under, to substitute, falsify, counterfeit. See pose.

    From Wiktionary