Think meaning

thĭngk
To use the mind in a certain way.

He thinks just like you do—always worrying.

verb
7
1
The definition of think is to have an idea or belief about something, or to use your brain to consider or judge, or to state something more politely.

When you believe that the sky is blue, this is an example of when you think the sky is blue.

When you pause to consider your position on an issue, this is an example of when you think about the issue.

If you believe someone is wrong but you want to say so nicely, this is an example of when you could say "I think you are wrong."

verb
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2
To have or formulate in the mind.

Think the happiest thought you can think.

verb
3
1
To have care or consideration.

Think first of the ones you love.

verb
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0
Requiring much thought to create or assimilate.

A think book.

adjective
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To have a belief, supposition, or opinion.

He thinks of himself as a wit. It's later than you think.

verb
1
1
To bring into a given condition by mental preoccupation.

He thought himself into a panic over the impending examination.

verb
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To exercise the power of reason, as by conceiving ideas, drawing inferences, and using judgment.

My cold made it difficult to think.

verb
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To consider or weigh an idea.

They are thinking about moving.

verb
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The act or an instance of deliberate or extended thinking; a meditation.
noun
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To form or have in the mind; conceive.

Thinking good thoughts.

verb
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To hold in one's opinion; judge; consider.

Many think her charming.

verb
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To believe; surmise; expect.

They think they can come.

verb
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To determine, resolve, work out, etc. by reasoning.

Think what your next move should be.

verb
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(now rare) To purpose; intend.

Thinking to do right.

verb
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To have the mind turned steadily toward; have constantly in mind.

Think success.

verb
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To use the mind for arriving at conclusions, making decisions, drawing inferences, etc.; reflect; reason.

Learn to think.

verb
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To have an opinion, belief, expectation, etc.

I just think so.

verb
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To weigh something mentally; reflect.

Think before you act.

verb
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To call to mind; recall; remember.
verb
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To have an opinion, judgment, etc.
verb
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To allow oneself to consider.
verb
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To have regard for; consider the welfare of.
verb
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To discover or invent; conceive (of)
verb
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(informal) The act of thinking.

Give it a good think.

noun
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(slang) Having to do with thinking.
adjective
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To seem.
verb impersonal
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A pattern or manner of thinking.

Groupthink.

affix
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To ponder, to go over in one's head.

Idly, the detective thought what his next move should be.

verb
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(intransitive) To communicate to oneself in one's mind, to try to find a solution to a problem.

I thought for three hours about the problem and still couldn't find the solution.

verb
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(intransitive) To conceive of something or someone (usually followed by of; infrequently, by on).

I tend to think of her as rather ugly.

verb
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To be of the opinion (that).

I think she is pretty, contrary to most people.

verb
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To guess; to reckon.

I think she'll pass the examination.

verb
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To consider, judge, regard, or look upon (something) as.

At the time I thought his adamant refusal to give in right. I hope you won't think me stupid if I ask you what that means.

verb
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To plan; to be considering; to be of a mind (to do something).
verb
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To presume; to venture.
verb
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To concentrate one's thoughts on; keep as a point of focus.

Think victory.

verb
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An act of thinking; consideration (of something).

I'll have a think about that and let you know.

noun
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(intransitive) To seem, to appear.
verb
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1
(informal) come to think of it
  • When one considers the matter; on reflection:
    Come to think of it, that road back there was the one we were supposed to take.
idiom
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think aloud
  • To speak one's thoughts audibly.
idiom
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think better of
  • To change one's mind about; reconsider.
idiom
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think big
  • To plan ambitiously or on a grand scale.
idiom
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think little of
  • To regard as inferior; have a poor opinion of.
idiom
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0
think nothing of
  • To give little consideration to; regard as routine or usual:
    Thought nothing of a 50-mile trip every day.
idiom
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think twice
  • To weigh something carefully:
    I'd think twice before spending all that money on clothes.
idiom
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think all the world of
  • to admire or love greatly
idiom
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think better of
  • to form a more favorable opinion of
  • to make a more sensible or practical decision about, after reconsidering
idiom
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think fit
  • to regard as proper or appropriate
idiom
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think little (or nothing) of
  • to attach little (or no) importance, value, etc. to
  • to have little (or no) hesitancy about
idiom
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think nothing of it!
  • you're welcome!
idiom
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think on
  • to give thought or consideration to
idiom
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think out
  • to think about completely or to the end
  • to work out, solve, discover, or plan by thinking
idiom
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think out loud
  • to speak one's thoughts as they occur
idiom
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think over
  • to give thought to; ponder well, as for reconsideration
idiom
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think through
  • to think about until one reaches a conclusion or resolution
idiom
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think twice
  • to reconsider; pause to think about again
idiom
0
0
think up
  • to invent, contrive, plan, etc. by thinking
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of think

  • Middle English thenken from Old English thencan tong- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English thinken, thynken, thenken, thenchen, from Old English þencan (“to meditate, cogitate, consider; think, have in mind; suppose, imagine, hold as an opinion or belief; think of, consider, employ the mind on a subject, reason"), from Proto-Germanic *þankijanÄ… (“to think, suppose, perceive"), from Proto-Indo-European *tong-, *teng- (“to think, feel, know"). Cognate with Scots think, thynk (“to think"), North Frisian teenk, taanke, tanke, tÃ¥nke (“to think"), Saterland Frisian toanke (“to think"), West Frisian tinke (“to think"), Dutch denken (“to think"), Low German denken (“to think"), dinken, German denken (“to think"), Danish tænke (“to think"), Swedish tänka (“to think"), Norwegian tenke (“to think"), Icelandic þekkja (“to know, recognise, identify, perceive"), Latin tongeō (“know").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English þyncan

    From Wiktionary