Philosophy meaning

fĭ-lŏsə-fē
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Philosophy is a set of ideals, standards or beliefs used to describe behavior and thought.

An example of philosophy is Buddhism.

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The study of the nature, causes, or principles of reality, knowledge, or values, based on logical reasoning.
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Theory or logical analysis of the principles underlying conduct, thought, knowledge, and the nature of the universe: included in philosophy are ethics, aesthetics, logic, epistemology, metaphysics, etc.
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The general principles or laws of a field of knowledge, activity, etc.

The philosophy of economics.

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Mental balance or composure thought of as resulting from the study of philosophy.
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(uncountable, originally) The love of wisdom.
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Love of, or the search for, wisdom or knowledge.
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An underlying theory or set of ideas relating to a particular field of activity or to life as a whole.

An original philosophy of advertising; an unusual philosophy of life.

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(uncountable) An academic discipline that seeks truth through reasoning rather than empiricism.

Philosophy is often divided into five major branches: logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics.

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(countable) A comprehensive system of belief.
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(countable) A view or outlook regarding fundamental principles underlying some domain.

A philosophy of government; a philosophy of education.

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(now rare) To philosophize.
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A study of human morals, character, and behavior.
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A system of thought based on or involving such study.

The philosophy of Hume.

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The study of the theoretical underpinnings of a particular field or discipline.

The philosophy of history.

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(archaic) A broader branch of (non-applied) science.
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(countable) A general principle (usually moral).
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Origin of philosophy

  • Middle English philosophie from Old French from Latin philosophia from Greek philosophiā from philosophos lover of wisdom, philosopher philosopher

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman philosophie, Old French philosophie, and their source, Latin philosophia, from Ancient Greek φιλοσοφία (philosophia), from φίλος (philos, “beloved") + σοφία (sophia, “wisdom").

    From Wiktionary