View meaning

vyo͝o
The definition of a view is a range of sight, what is being seen or an opinion.

An example of view is being able to see a car parked across the street.

An example of a view is a beautiful sunset from the top of a mountain.

An example of a view is someone thinking foreign cars are superior to American made cars.

noun
2
0
An individual and personal perception, judgment, or interpretation; an opinion.

In his view, aid to the rebels should be suspended.

noun
0
0
A seeing or looking, as in inspection or examination.
noun
0
0
Sight or vision; esp., range of vision.

Not a person in view.

noun
0
0
Mental examination or survey; critical contemplation.

To take a correct view of a situation.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
That which is seen; esp., a scene or prospect, as of a landscape.

A room with a view.

noun
0
0
A picture, sketch, or photograph of a scene, esp. of a landscape.
noun
0
0
Visual appearance or aspect of something.
noun
0
0
Manner of regarding or considering something; judgment; opinion.

One's views on a matter.

noun
0
0
That which is worked toward or sought; object; aim; goal.

To have a view to bettering one's condition.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A general survey or summary.
noun
0
0
A formal inspection made by a jury outside of court, as at the scene of a crime or accident.
noun
0
0
To inspect; scrutinize.
verb
0
0
To look at or see; behold.
verb
0
0
To survey mentally; consider.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To regard in a particular way.

To view a situation with fear.

verb
0
0
(1) To display and look at data on screen.
0
0
An unobstructed look out of the windows of a dwelling.
noun
0
0
An urban encumbrance prohibiting the building of anything that would obstruct a person’s view from his or her window.
noun
0
0
A jury’s trip to a crime scene or other location thought necessary to see the physical particulars of the case before it that might not be capable of being observed in the courtroom.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A lineup. See also lineup.
noun
0
0
The act of seeing or looking at something.

He changed seat to get a complete view of the stage.

noun
0
0
The range of vision.

If there are any rabbits in this park, they keep carefully out of our view.

noun
0
0
Something to look at, such as scenery.

My flat has a view of a junkyard.

The view from a window.

noun
0
0
A picture, drawn or painted; a sketch.

A fine view of Lake George.

noun
0
0
Advertisement

I need more information to get a better view of the situation.

noun
0
0
A way of understanding something, an opinion, a theory.

Your view on evolution is based on religion, not on scientific findings.

noun
0
0
A point of view.

From my view that is a stupid proposition.

noun
0
0

He smuggled a knife into prison with a view to using it as a weapon.

noun
0
0
(computing, databases) A virtual or logical table composed of the result set of a query in relational databases.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(computing, programming) The part of a computer program which is visible to the user, the part the user interacts with; a user interface to the underlying logic of the program.
noun
0
0
A wake.
noun
0
0
To look at.

He viewed the painting and praised the artist for his masterpiece.

verb
0
0
To show.

To view the desktop, click the small desktop icon on the bottom of your screen.

verb
0
0
To view means to look at.

An example of to view is checking out the shoes someone is wearing.

verb
0
1
Advertisement
in view of
  • Taking into account; in consideration of.
idiom
0
0
on view
  • Placed so as to be seen; exhibited.
idiom
0
0
in view
  • In sight.
  • Under consideration.
  • In mind or memory.
  • As a goal, object, or expectation.
idiom
0
0
in view of
  • In consideration of; because of.
idiom
0
0
on view
  • Displayed or exhibited publicly.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
with a view to
  • With the purpose of.
  • With a hope of; looking forward to.
idiom
0
0

Origin of view

  • Middle English vewe from Anglo-Norman from feminine past participle of veoir to see from Latin vidēre weid- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman vewe, from Old French veue (French: vue), feminine past participle of veoir (“to see") (French: voir).

    From Wiktionary