Target meaning

tärgĭt
A railroad signal that indicates the position of a switch by its color, position, and shape.
noun
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3
One to be influenced or changed by an action or event.

Children were the target of the new advertising campaign.

noun
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1
A small round shield.
noun
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(historical) A small shield, esp. a round one.
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A ship, building, site, etc. that is the object of a military attack.
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A usually metal part in an x-ray tube on which a beam of electrons is focused and from which x-rays are emitted.
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An object of criticism or verbal attack.
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A desired goal.

Achieved our target for quarterly sales.

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The sliding sight on a surveyor's leveling rod.
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A usually metal part in an x-ray tube on which a beam of electrons is focused and from which x-rays are emitted.
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To aim at or identify as a target.

Targeted the airport hangar.

verb
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To identify or treat as the object of action, criticism, or change.

Targeted the molecule for study; targeted teenagers with the ad campaign.

verb
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To design for or direct toward a specific object or audience.

Targeted the ad campaign toward seniors.

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Someone or something that is the focus of attention, interest, etc.
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An object of verbal attack, criticism, or ridicule.
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Something resembling a target in shape or use.
  • The sliding sight on a surveyor's leveling rod.
  • A disk-shaped signal on a railroad switch.
  • A metallic insert, usually of tungsten or molybdenum, in the anode of an X-ray tube, upon which the stream of cathode rays impinges and from which X-rays emanate.
  • A surface, object, etc. subjected to irradiation or to bombardment as by nuclear particles.
noun
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To establish as a target, goal, etc.
verb
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(biochemistry) A molecule or molecular structure, such as a protein or a nucleic acid, that a drug or other compound interacts with and modulates the activity of.
noun
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(biochemistry) To interact with as a target.

Drugs that target estrogen receptors.

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Target is defined as to aim at something or someone in particular.

An example of target is to aim a gun while at a shooting range.

An example of target is to concentrate all efforts on one goal.

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The definition of a target is an object or goal that is being aimed at.

An example of target is a bulls-eye.

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The focus of an investigation, as in grand jury target; in corporate law, the focus of a takeover bid.
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A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

Take careful aim at the target.

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They have a target to finish the project by November.

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A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.
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(sports) The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark.

He made a good target.

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(surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.
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(rail transport) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.
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(cricket) The number of runs that the side batting last needs to score in the final innings in order to win.
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(linguistics) The tenor of a metaphor.
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(translation studies) The translated version of a document, or the language into which translation occurs.

Do you charge by source or target?

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A person (group of people) that a person or organization is trying to employ or to have as a customer, audience etc.
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To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).
verb
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(figuratively) To aim for as an audience or demographic.

The advertising campaign targeted older women.

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(computing) To produce code suitable for.

This cross-platform compiler can target any of several processors.

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on target
  • Completely accurate, precise, or valid:
    Observations that were right on target.
idiom
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on target
  • completely accurate; precise
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of target

  • Middle English small targe from Old French targuete variant of targete diminutive of targe light shield of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Diminutive of targe.

    From Wiktionary