Butt meaning

bŭt
To hit or push something with the head or horns.
verb
13
4
To hit or push against with the head or horns; ram.
verb
13
5
A push or blow with the head or horns.
noun
10
4
To project forward or out.
verb
10
6
A butt joint.
noun
6
1
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A butt hinge.
noun
6
1
A large cask.
noun
5
0
One that serves as an object of ridicule or contempt.

I was the butt of their jokes.

noun
4
1
A unit of volume equal to two hogsheads, usually the equivalent of 126 US gallons (about 477 liters).
noun
3
0
(informal) The buttocks; the rear end.
noun
3
1
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A large barrel or cask, as for wine or beer.
noun
2
0
An embankment or hollow used as a blind by hunters of wildfowl.
noun
1
0
A short or broken remnant; a stub.
noun
1
0
(slang) Very. Used as an intensive.

Butt ugly; butt expensive.

adverb
1
0
A hole in the ground used as a blind by hunters of fowl.
noun
1
0
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An object of ridicule or criticism.
noun
1
0
To join end to end.
verb
1
0
To abut on.
verb
1
0
The larger or thicker end of an object.

The butt of a rifle.

noun
1
1
To make a butting motion.
verb
1
1
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The definition of a butt is the end of something, or is short for the buttocks.

An example of butt is the end of a cigarette.

An example of butt is the part of the body on which people sit.

noun
0
0
The thick end of anything, as of a whip handle, rifle stock, etc.
noun
0
0
The remaining end of anything; stub; stump; specif., the stub of a smoked cigarette or cigar.
noun
0
0
(informal) The buttocks.
noun
0
0
(tanning) The part of a hide or pelt that covered the animal's backside.
noun
0
0
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To strike or push with the head or horns; ram with the head.
verb
0
0
To make abut.
verb
0
0
To move or drive headfirst.
verb
0
0
To stick out; project.
verb
0
0
To abut.
verb
0
0
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A thrust with the head or horns.
noun
0
0
Any of various flatfishes, as the halibut or turbot.
noun
0
0
(slang) The buttocks. (used as a euphemism; less objectionable than arse/ass)

Get up off your butt and get to work.

noun
0
0
(slang) The whole buttocks and pelvic region that includes one's private parts.

I can see your butt.

When the woman in the dress was sitting with her legs up, I could see up her butt.

noun
0
0
​(slang, pejorative) Body; self.

Get your butt to the car.

We can't chat today. I have to get my butt to work before I'm late.

noun
0
0
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(slang) A used cigarette.
noun
0
0
The larger or thicker end of anything; the blunt end, in distinction from the sharp end; as, the butt of a rifle. Formerly also spelled but.
noun
0
0
A limit; a bound; a goal; the extreme bound; the end.
noun
0
0
A mark to be shot at; a target.
noun
0
0
A piece of land left unplowed at the end of a field.
noun
0
0
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A person at whom ridicule, jest, or contempt is directed.

He's usually the butt of their jokes.

noun
0
0
A push, thrust, or sudden blow, given by the head; a head butt.

Be careful in the pen, that ram can knock you down with a butt.

The handcuffed suspect gave the officer a desperate butt in the chest.

noun
0
0
A thrust in fencing.
noun
0
0
(lacrosse) The plastic or rubber cap used to cover the open end of a lacrosse stick's shaft in order to reduce injury.
noun
0
0
The portion of a half-coupling fastened to the end of a hose.
noun
0
0
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The end of a connecting rod or other like piece, to which the boxing is attached by the strap, cotter, and gib.
noun
0
0
(mechanical) A joint where the ends of two objects come squarely together without scarfing or chamfering; – also called a butt joint.
noun
0
0
(carpentry) A kind of hinge used in hanging doors, etc., so named because it is attached to the inside edge of the door and butts against the casing, instead of on its face, like the strap hinge; also called butt hinge.
noun
0
0
(shipbuilding) The joint where two planks in a strake meet.
noun
0
0
(leather trades) The thickest and stoutest part of tanned oxhides, used for soles of boots, harness, trunks.
noun
0
0
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The hut or shelter of the person who attends to the targets in rifle practice.
noun
0
0
(English units) An English measure of capacity for liquids, containing 126 wine gallons which is one-half tun; equivalent to the pipe.
noun
0
0
A wooden cask for storing wine, usually containing 126 gallons.
noun
0
0
Any of various flatfish such as sole, plaice or turbot.
noun
0
0
To strike bluntly, particularly with the head.
verb
0
0
To join at the butt, end, or outward extremity; to terminate; to be bounded; to abut.
verb
0
0
To join or be joined end to end; abut.
verb
0
1
(slang) A cigarette.
noun
0
1
To strike or bump against.
verb
0
1
A thrust in fencing.
noun
0
1
A measure of liquid capacity equal to.
  • For wine, 126 gallons (2 hogsheads) or c. 104.9 imperial gallons (c. 476.9 liters)
  • For ale or beer, 108 gallons or c. 89.9 imperial gallons (c. 408.8 liters)
noun
0
1
butt in
  • to mix into (another's business, a conversation, etc.)
idiom
0
0
butt out!
  • stop meddling! mind your own business!
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of butt

  • Middle English butten from Anglo-Norman butter (variant of Old French bouter butt1) and from but end butt4

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English butten from Old French bouter to strike of Germanic origin bhau- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English butte target from Old French from but goal, end, target butt4

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French boute from Late Latin buttia variant of buttis

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English butte from Old French but end of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English but, butte (“goal, mark, butt of land”), from Old English byt, bytt (“small piece of land”) and *butt (attested in diminutive buttuc (“end, small piece of land”) > English buttock), from Proto-Germanic *butaz, *buttaz (“end, piece”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudnó-, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰaud-, *bʰed-, *bʰau- (“to beat, push”). Cognate with Norwegian butt (“stump, block”), Icelandic bútur (“piece, fragment”), Low German butt (“blunt, clumsy”). Influenced by Old French but, butte (“but, mark”), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Related to beat, boot.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English butten, from Anglo-Norman buter, boter (“to push, butt, strike”), from Old Frankish *bōtan (“to hit, beat”), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (“to beat, push”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰÀud-, *bʰÀu- (“to beat, push, strike”). Cognate with Old English bēatan (“to beat”). More at beat.

    From Wiktionary