Join meaning

join
To put or bring together; connect; fasten.
verb
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A joint; a junction.
noun
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To adjoin.

Where the garage joins the house.

verb
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To join is defined as to bring or connect together or to become part of something that already exists.

An example of to join is for a couple to hold hands.

An example of to join is to become a member of a book club.

verb
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To become a member of a group.
verb
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To take part; participate.

Joined in the search.

verb
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To connect (points), as with a straight line.
verb
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To meet and merge with.

Where the creek joins the river.

verb
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To become a part or member of.

Joined the photography club.

verb
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To come into the company of.

Joined the group in the waiting room.

verb
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To participate with in an act or activity.

The committee joins me in welcoming you.

verb
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To come together so as to form a connection.

Where the two bones join.

verb
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To act together; form an alliance.

The two factions joined to oppose the measure.

verb
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To make into one; unite.

Join forces, join people in marriage.

verb
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To engage in; enter into.

Opposing armies joined battle on the plain.

verb
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To become a part or member of; enter into association with.

To join a club.

verb
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To go to and combine with.

The path joins the highway.

verb
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(informal) To adjoin.
verb
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(geom.) To connect with a straight line or curve.
verb
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To come together; meet.
verb
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To participate (in a conversation, singing, an activity, etc.)
verb
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A place of joining; joint.
noun
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In relational database management, to match one table (file) against another based on some condition creating a third table with data from the matching tables. For example, a customer table can be joined with an order table creating a table for all customers who purchased a particular product.The default type of join is known as an "inner" join. It produces a resulting record if there is a matching condition. For example, matching shipments with receipts would produce only those shipments that have been received. On the other hand, an "outer" join using that example would create a record for every shipment whether or not it was received. The data for received items would be attached to the shipments, and empty, or null, fields would be attached to shipments without receipts.
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To combine more than one item into one; to put together.

The plumber joined the two ends of the broken pipe. We joined our efforts to get an even better result.

verb
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To come together; to meet.

Parallel lines never join. These two rivers join in about 80 miles.

verb
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To come into the company of.

I will join you watching the football game as soon as I have finished my work.

verb
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To become a member of.

Many children join a sports club. Most politicians have joined a party.

verb
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(computing, databases) To produce an intersection of data in two or more database tables.

By joining the Customer table on the Product table, we can show each customer's name alongside the products they have ordered.

verb
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To unite in marriage.
verb
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To accept, or engage in, as a contest.

To join encounter, battle, or issue.

verb
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An intersection of piping or wiring; an interconnect.
noun
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(computing, databases) An intersection of data in two or more database tables.
noun
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(algebra) The lowest upper bound, an operation between pairs of elements in a lattice, denoted by the symbol .
noun
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To put or bring together so as to make continuous or form a unit.

Join two boards with nails; joined hands in a circle.

verb
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To put or bring into close association or relationship.

Two families that were joined by marriage; join forces.

verb
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join battle
  • to start fighting or competing
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

join battle

Origin of join

  • Middle English joinen from Old French joindre joign-, join- from Latin iungere yeug- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French joindre, from Latin iungō (“join, yoke”), from Proto-Indo-European *yeug- “to join, unite”.

    From Wiktionary