Bound meaning

bound
Moving or travelling towards.
suffix
5
0
To leap forward or upward; spring.
verb
4
0
The definition of bound is destined to happen or tied or secured physically or emotionally.

An example of bound is an accident occurring if someone continuously plays dangerously with sharp knives.

An example of bound is hands tied together with rope.

adjective
3
0
To bounce; rebound.
verb
3
0
To progress by forward leaps or springs.
verb
2
0
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Being under legal or moral obligation.

Bound by my promise.

adjective
1
0
A leap; a jump.
noun
0
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A rebound; a bounce.
noun
0
0
A boundary; a limit.

Our joy knew no bounds. Your remarks exceed the bounds of reason.

noun
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To set a limit to; confine.

A high wall that bounded the prison yard; lives that were bounded by poverty.

verb
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To constitute the boundary or limit of.

A city park that was bounded by busy streets.

verb
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To identify the boundaries of; demarcate.
verb
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To border on another place, state, or country.
verb
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Confined by bonds; tied.

Bound hostages.

adjective
0
0
Equipped with a cover or binding.

Bound volumes.

adjective
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0
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Predetermined; certain.

We're bound to be late.

adjective
0
0
Determined; resolved.

Many public policy students are bound to be politicians one day.

adjective
0
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Being a form, especially a morpheme, that cannot stand as an independent word, such as a prefix or suffix.
adjective
0
0
Constipated.
adjective
0
0
Headed or intending to head in a specified direction.

Commuters bound for home; a south-bound train.

adjective
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0
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To move with a leap or series of leaps.
verb
0
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To spring back from a surface after striking it, as a ball does; bounce; rebound.
verb
0
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To cause to bound or bounce.
verb
0
0
A jump; leap.
noun
0
0
A springing back from a surface after striking it; bounce.
noun
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verb
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Confined by or as by binding; tied.
adjective
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Closely connected or related.
adjective
0
0
Certain; sure; destined.

Bound to lose.

adjective
0
0
Under compulsion; obliged.

Legally bound to accept.

adjective
0
0
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Constipated.
adjective
0
0
Provided with a binding or attached cover, as a book.
adjective
0
0
Having one's mind made up; resolved.

A team bound on winning.

adjective
0
0
Designating a form, or morpheme, that never occurs alone as an independent word.

In “singing,” -ing is a bound form, but sing is not.

adjective
0
0
Ready to go or going; headed.

Bound for home.

adjective
0
0
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Ready; prepared.
adjective
0
0
A boundary; limit.
noun
0
0
An area near, alongside, or enclosed by a boundary.
noun
0
0
To provide with bounds; limit; confine.
verb
0
0
To be a limit or boundary to.
verb
0
0
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To name the boundaries of (a state, etc.)
verb
0
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To have a boundary (on another country, etc.)
verb
0
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Going or headed toward.

Southbound, championship-bound.

affix
0
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Confined by or to.

Snowbound, housebound.

affix
0
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Simple past tense and past participle of bind.

I bound the splint to my leg.

I had bound the splint with duct tape.

verb
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(with infinitive) Obliged (to).

You are not legally bound to reply.

adjective
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(with infinitive) Very likely (to).

They were bound to come into conflict eventually.

adjective
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(linguistics, of a morpheme) That cannot stand alone as a free word.
adjective
0
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(mathematics, logic, of a variable) Constrained by a quantifier.
adjective
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0
adjective
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(often used in plural) A boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory.

I reached the northern bound of my property, took a deep breath and walked on.

Somewhere within these bounds you may find a buried treasure.

noun
0
0
(mathematics) A value which is known to be greater or smaller than a given set of values.
noun
0
0
To surround a territory or other geographical entity.

France, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra bound Spain.

Kansas is bounded by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south and Colorado on the west.

verb
0
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(mathematics) To be the boundary of.
verb
0
0
A sizeable jump, great leap.

The deer crossed the stream in a single bound.

noun
0
0
A spring from one foot to the other in dancing.
noun
0
0
(dated) A bounce; a rebound.

The bound of a ball.

noun
0
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(intransitive) To leap, move by jumping.

The rabbit bounded down the lane.

verb
0
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To cause to leap.

To bound a horse.

verb
0
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(intransitive, dated) To rebound; to bounce.

A rubber ball bounds on the floor.

verb
0
0
(dated) To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; to bounce.

To bound a ball on the floor.

verb
0
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Ready, able to start or go (to); moving in the direction (of).

Which way are you bound?

Is that message bound for me?

adjective
0
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The territory on, within, or near limiting lines.

The bounds of the kingdom.

noun
0
1
in
  • Within the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore in play or legal.
idiom
0
0
out of bounds
  • Outside the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore not in play or legal.
  • In such a way as to violate or exceed acceptable rules or standards, as of decency:.
    Felt the guest's behavior was out of bounds.
idiom
0
0
bound up in
  • Deeply devoted to.
  • Implicated or involved in.
idiom
0
0
out of bounds
  • Beyond the boundaries or limits, as of a playing field.
  • Not to be entered or used; forbidden.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bound

  • French bondir to bounce from Old French to resound perhaps from Vulgar Latin bombitīre from Latin bombitāre to hum from bombus a humming sound from Greek bombos
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Alteration of Middle English boun ready from Old Norse būinn past participle of būa to get ready bheuə- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French bodne, bonde Anglo-Norman bunde both from Medieval Latin bodina of Celtic origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French bondir (“to leap, bound, originally make a loud resounding noise”); perhaps, from Late Latin bombitāre, present active infinitive of bombitō (“hum, buzz”), frequentive verb, from Latin bombus (“a humming or buzzing”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English bounde, from Old French bunne, from Medieval Latin bodina, earlier butina (“a bound, limit”)
    From Wiktionary
  • Alteration of boun, with -d partly for euphonic effect and partly by association with Etymology 1, above.
    From Wiktionary
  • See bind
    From Wiktionary