Bounce meaning

bouns
To discharge from employment.
verb
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Bounce is defined as to spring back, jump or move suddenly.

An example of bounce is for a ball to come back after hitting a wall.

verb
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The definition of a bounce is a leap, jump or a spring back.

An example of a bounce is the action a ball takes after you throw it down towards the floor.

noun
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To rebound after having struck an object or a surface.
verb
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To move jerkily; bump.

The car bounced over the potholes.

verb
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To bound.

Children bouncing into the room.

verb
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To be sent back by a bank as valueless.

A check that bounced.

verb
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To be sent back by a mail server as undeliverable.

That e-mail bounced because I used “com” instead of “net.”

verb
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To hit a ground ball to an infielder.

The batter bounced out to the shortstop.

verb
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To cause to strike an object or a surface and rebound.

Bounce a ball on the sidewalk.

verb
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To present or propose for comment or approval. Often used with off:

Bounced a few ideas off my boss.

verb
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To write (a check) on an overdrawn bank account.
verb
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Cheerfulness or liveliness.
noun
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Expulsion; dismissal.

Was given the bounce from the job.

noun
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Loud, arrogant speech; bluster.
noun
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To bump or thump.
verb
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To cause to hit against a surface so as to spring back.

To bounce a ball.

verb
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To have (a check) returned by one's bank to the payee as worthless because there are insufficient funds in one's account to cover it.
verb
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To put (an undesirable person) out by force.
verb
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To spring back from a surface after striking it; rebound.
verb
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To move with an up-and-down motion, as from resilience.
verb
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To move suddenly; spring; jump.

To bounce out of bed.

verb
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To be returned to the payee by a bank as worthless because there are insufficient funds in the payer's account to cover it.
verb
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Capacity for bouncing; resilience.

The ball has lost its bounce.

noun
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A temporary increase or rise, as in value or popularity.

A political candidate's post-convention bounce in the polls.

noun
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Impudence; bluster.
noun
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A quick, but moderate, upward rise in a market that had previously traded lower. Also called a dead cat bounce when price gains aren’t expected to last.
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To write a check without having sufficient funds to cover it. A bounced check is one that has been rejected by a bank because there are insufficient funds in the checking account.
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(intransitive) To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle.

The tennis ball bounced off the wall before coming to rest in the ditch.

verb
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(intransitive) To move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.

He bounces nervously on his chair.

verb
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To cause to move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.

He bounced the child on his knee.

verb
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To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound.

She bounced into the room.

verb
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(intransitive, informal, of a cheque/check) To be refused by a bank because it is drawn on insufficient funds.

We can’t accept further checks from you, as your last one bounced.

verb
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(informal) To fail to cover (have sufficient funds f) (a draft presented against one's account).

He tends to bounce a check or two toward the end of each month, before his payday.

verb
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(intransitive, slang) To leave.

Let’s wrap this up, I gotta bounce.

verb
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(US, slang, dated) To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.
verb
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(intransitive, slang, African American Vernacular) (sometimes employing the preposition with) To have sexual intercourse.
verb
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(air combat) To attack unexpectedly.

The squadron was bounced north of the town.

verb
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(intransitive, electronics) To turn power off and back on; to reset.

See if it helps to bounce the router.

verb
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(intransitive, Internet, of an e-mail message or address) To return undelivered.

What’s your new email address – the old one bounces.

The girl in the bar told me her address is thirsty@example.com, but my mail to that address bounced back to me.

verb
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(intransitive, aviation) To land hard and lift off again due to excess momentum.

The student pilot bounced several times during his landing.

verb
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(slang, dated) To bully; to scold.

verb
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(archaic) To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; to knock loudly.
verb
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(archaic) To boast; to bluster.
verb
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A change of direction of motion after hitting the ground or an obstacle.
noun
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A movement up and then down (vice versa), once or repeatedly.
noun
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An email return with any error.
noun
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The sack, licensing.
noun
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A bang, boom.
noun
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A drink based on brandy.
noun
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A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.
noun
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Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

noun
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Scyllium catulus, a European dogfish.
noun
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A genre of New Orleans music.
noun
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(slang, African American Vernacular) Drugs.
noun
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(slang, African American Vernacular) Swagger.
noun
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(slang, African American Vernacular) A 'good' beat.
noun
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(slang, African American Vernacular) A talent for leaping.

Them pro-ballers got bounce!

noun
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bounce back
  • To recover strength, good humor, etc. quickly.
idiom
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the bounce
  • Dismissal or forcible ejection.
    To give (or get) the bounce.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the bounce

Origin of bounce

  • Probably from Middle English bounsen to beat
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition