Sack meaning

săk
Frequency:
To sack is a slang term that is defined as to fire someone from their job.

An example of sack is when a clerk is dismissed from their job because they took money from the register.

verb
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A bag; especially a large bag of strong, coarse material for storage and handling of various commodities, such as potatoes, coal, coffee; or, a bag with handles used at a supermarket, a grocery sack; or, a small bag for small items, a satchel.
noun
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(informal) A bed, mattress, or sleeping bag.

Hit the sack at 10:00.

noun
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The looting or pillaging of a captured city or town.
noun
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(uncountable) Loot or booty obtained by pillage.
noun
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Any of various light, dry, strong wines from Spain and the Canary Islands, imported to England in the 1500s and 1600s.
noun
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1
The definition of a sack is a bag used for putting things in or a bag that already contains something.

An example of a sack is a reusable grocery bag.

noun
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A short loose-fitting garment for women and children.
noun
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(baseball) A base.
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(football) A successful attempt at sacking the quarterback.
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To place into a sack.

Sacked the groceries.

verb
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(slang) To discharge from employment.

Sacked the workers who were caught embezzling.

verb
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(football) To tackle (a quarterback attempting to pass the ball) behind the line of scrimmage.
verb
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To rob (a town, for example) of goods or valuables, especially after capture.
verb
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The quantity contained in such a bag: a measure of weight of varying amounts.
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(slang) Dismissal from a job; discharge.
noun
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(slang) A bed, bunk, etc.
noun
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noun
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(football) The act of sacking a passer.
noun
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To put into a sack or sacks.
verb
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(slang) To dismiss (a person) from a job; discharge.
verb
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(football) To tackle (a passer who is attempting a forward pass)
verb
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The plundering or looting, esp. by soldiers, of a captured city or town.
noun
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To plunder or loot (a captured city, etc.)
verb
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Any of various dry white wines from Spain or the Canary Islands, popular in England during the 16th and 17th cent.
noun
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The amount a sack holds; also, an archaic or historical measure of varying capacity, depending on commodity type and according to local usage; an old English measure of weight, usually of wool, equal to 13 stone (182 pounds), or in other sources, 26 stone (364 pounds).
noun
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(uncountable) The plunder and pillaging of a captured town or city.

The sack of Rome.

noun
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(American football) A successful tackle of the quarterback. See verb sense3 below.
noun
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(baseball) One of the square bases anchored at first base, second base, or third base.

He twisted his ankle sliding into the sack at second.

noun
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(informal) Dismissal from employment, or discharge from a position, usually as give (someone) the sack or get the sack. See verb sense4 below.

The boss is gonna give her the sack today.

He got the sack for being late all the time.

noun
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(colloquial, US) Bed; usually as hit the sack or in the sack. See also sack out.
noun
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(dated) (also sacque) A kind of loose-fitting gown or dress with sleeves which hangs from the shoulders, such as a gown with a Watteau back or sack-back, fashionable in the late 17th to 18th century; or, formerly, a loose-fitting hip-length jacket, cloak or cape.
noun
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(dated) A sack coat; a kind of coat worn by men, and extending from top to bottom without a cross seam.
noun
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(vulgar, slang) The scrotum.

He got passed the ball, but it hit him in the sack.

noun
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To put in a sack or sacks.

Help me sack the groceries.

verb
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To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders.
verb
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To plunder or pillage, especially after capture; to obtain spoils of war from.

The barbarians sacked Rome.

verb
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(American football) To tackle, usually to tackle the offensive quarterback behind the line of scrimmage before he is able to throw a pass.
verb
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(informal) To discharge from a job or position; to fire.

He was sacked last September.

verb
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(colloquial) In the phrase sack out, to fall asleep. See also hit the sack.

The kids all sacked out before 9:00 on New Year's Eve.

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(dated) A variety of light-colored dry wine from Spain or the Canary Islands; also, any strong white wine from southern Europe; sherry.
noun
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(slang) Dismissal from employment.

Finally got the sack after a year of ineptitude.

noun
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(slang) sack in
idiom
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hit the sack
  • to go to bed
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sack

  • Probably from French (mettre à) sac (to put in) a sack from Old French sac sack from Latin saccus sack, bag sack1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English sacc from Latin saccus from Greek sakkos of Semitic origin śqq in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French (vin) sec dry (wine) from Old French from Latin siccus dry

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sak (“bag, sackcloth"), from Old English sacc (“sack, bag") and Old English sæcc (“sackcloth, sacking"); both from Proto-Germanic *sakkuz (“sack"), from Latin saccus (“large bag"), from Ancient Greek σάκκος (sákkos, “bag of coarse cloth"), from Phoenician, Ancient Egyptian 𓆷𓈎𓄜 (sAq, “sack"). Cognate with Dutch zak, German Sack, Swedish säck, Hebrew שַׂק (Å›aq), Akkadian ð’†­ð’Š“ (saqqu).

    From Wiktionary

  • From earlier (wyne) seck, from Middle French (vin) sec (“dry (wine)"), from Latin siccus (“dry")

    From Wiktionary