Boot definition

bo͝ot
Frequency:
A durable covering for the foot and part or much of the leg, usually made of leather, fabric, plastic, or rubber.
noun
5
2
(chiefly british) An automobile trunk.
noun
3
0
An instrument of torture, used to crush the foot and leg.
noun
2
0
(computers) To start (a computer) by loading an operating system from a disk.
verb
2
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A Denver boot.
noun
3
2
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A protective covering, especially a sheath to enclose the base of a floor-mounted gear shift lever in a car or truck.
noun
2
1
In commercial law, money or property given or received to balance or equalize an exchange property.
noun
1
0
To boot is to kick out, or to start up a computer.

An example of to boot is to fire someone from a job.

An example of to boot is to start up a computer and get it ready to check email and access your files.

verb
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The definition of a boot is a type of shoe or foot covering that covers part of the leg as well.

An example of a boot is what cowboys wear on their feet.

noun
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A kick.
noun
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(slang) An unceremonious dismissal, as from a job. Used with the.
noun
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(slang) A swift, pleasurable feeling; a thrill.
noun
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(archaic) Advantage; avail.
noun
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(archaic) Remedy; profit; benefit.
noun
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In tax law, the extra money, unrelated or non-like-kind property, or assumption of liabilities included in an otherwise like-kind nontaxable exchange of property. The boot is subject to income tax.
noun
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A heavy shoe that covers part of the leg.
noun
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A blow with the foot; a kick.
noun
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(construction) A flexible cover of rubber or plastic, which may be preformed to a particular shape and used to protect a shaft, lever, switch, or opening from dust, dirt, moisture, etc.
noun
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A torture device used on the feet or legs, such as a Spanish boot.
noun
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0
(US) A parking enforcement device used to immobilize a car until it can be towed or a fine is paid; a wheel clamp.
noun
0
0
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A rubber bladder on the leading edge of an aircraft’s wing, which is inflated periodically to remove ice buildup. A deicing boot.
noun
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(archaic) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.
noun
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(Australia, UK, New Zealand, automotive) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan or saloon car.
noun
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0
(computing, informal) The act or process of removing somebody from a chat room.
noun
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(UK, slang) Unattractive person, ugly woman.
noun
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(firearms) A hard plastic case for a long firearm, typically moulded to the shape of the gun and intended for use in a vehicle.
noun
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To kick.

I booted the ball toward my teammate.

verb
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To put boots on, especially for riding.
verb
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To apply corporal punishment (compare slippering).
verb
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(informal) To forcibly eject.

We need to boot those troublemakers as soon as possible.

verb
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0
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(slang) To vomit.

Sorry, I didn’t mean to boot all over your couch.

verb
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(computing, informal) To disconnect forcibly; to eject from an online service, conversation, etc.
verb
0
0
(dated) Remedy, amends.
noun
0
0
(uncountable) Profit, plunder.
noun
0
0
To profit, avail, benefit.
verb
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0
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To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition.
verb
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(computing) The act or process of bootstrapping; the starting or re-starting of a computing device.

It took three boots, but I finally got the application installed.

noun
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(computing) To bootstrap; to start a system, eg. a computer, by invoking its boot process or bootstrap.

When arriving at the office, first thing I do is booting my machine.

verb
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A bootleg recording.
noun
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0
A marine or navy recruit in basic training.
noun
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1
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(computers) The process of starting or restarting a computer.
noun
0
1
To put boots on.
verb
0
1
To kick.

Booted the ball into the goal.

verb
0
1
(slang) To discharge unceremoniously.
verb
0
1
To disable (a vehicle) by attaching a Denver boot.
verb
0
1
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(baseball) To misplay (a ground ball).
verb
0
1
To be of help or advantage; avail.
verb
0
1
to boot
  • In addition; besides:
    The new cruise ship was not only the biggest in the world, but the fastest to boot.
idiom
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0
(old-fashioned) to boot
  • besides; in addition
idiom
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0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
boot
Plural:
boots

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of boot

  • Middle English boten to be of help from Old English bōtian from bōt help bhad- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English bote from Old French

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English boote, bote (“shoe”), from Old French bote (“a high, thick shoe”). Of obscure origin, but probably related to Old French bot (“club-foot”), Old French bot (“fat, short, blunt”), probably from Old Norse buttr (“short, blunt”), from Proto-Germanic *buttaz, *butaz (“cut off, short, numb, blunt”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhud-, *bhAud-, *bheid- (“to strike, push, shock”). Compare Norwegian butt (“stump”), Low German butt (“blunt, plump”), Old English bytt (“small piece of land”), Old English buttuc (“end”). More at buttock.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English boote, bote, bot, from Old English bōt (“help, relief, advantage, remedy; compensation for an injury or wrong; (peace) offering, recompense, amends, atonement, reformation, penance, repentance”), from Proto-Germanic *bōtō (“atonement, improvement”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰÀd- (“good”). Akin to Old Norse bót (“bettering, remedy”) (Danish bod), Gothic (bota), German Buße.

    From Wiktionary

  • From bootleg (“to make or sell illegally”), by shortening

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortening of bootstrap.

    From Wiktionary