Boot meaning

bo͝ot
A durable covering for the foot and part or much of the leg, usually made of leather, fabric, plastic, or rubber.
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An automobile trunk.
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A marine or navy recruit in basic training.
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To boot is to kick out, or to start up a computer.

An example of to boot is to fire someone from a job.

An example of to boot is to start up a computer and get it ready to check email and access your files.

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A protective covering, especially a sheath to enclose the base of a floor-mounted gear shift lever in a car or truck.
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A Denver boot.
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The process of starting or restarting a computer.
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An instrument of torture, used to crush the foot and leg.
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To put boots on.
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To kick.

Booted the ball into the goal.

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To discharge unceremoniously.
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To start (a computer) by loading an operating system from a disk.
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To disable (a vehicle) by attaching a Denver boot.
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To misplay (a ground ball).
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To be of help or advantage; avail.
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Advantage; avail.
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Remedy; profit; benefit.
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A boot causes the computer to start executing instructions. PCs and Macs contain built-in instructions in a ROM or flash memory chip that are automatically executed on startup. These instructions search for the operating system, load it and pass control to it. Booting a computer today means turning it on or selecting Restart. In the early days of computing, booting required pressing several buttons at the console.Put Your Boots On!The term comes from "bootstrap." Since bootstraps help you get your boots on, booting the computer helps it get its first instructions. The term is often used erroneously for application software. For example, you might hear someone say "let's boot Excel," whereas the correct usage is "launch Excel" or "load Excel." See cold boot, warm boot, clean boot, boot loader and first boot sequence.
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In tax law, the extra money, unrelated or non-like-kind property, or assumption of liabilities included in an otherwise like-kind nontaxable exchange of property. The boot is subject to income tax.
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In commercial law, money or property given or received to balance or equalize an exchange property.
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A heavy shoe that covers part of the leg.
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A blow with the foot; a kick.
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(construction) A flexible cover of rubber or plastic, which may be preformed to a particular shape and used to protect a shaft, lever, switch, or opening from dust, dirt, moisture, etc.
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A torture device used on the feet or legs, such as a Spanish boot.
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(US) A parking enforcement device used to immobilize a car until it can be towed or a fine is paid; a wheel clamp.
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A rubber bladder on the leading edge of an aircraft’s wing, which is inflated periodically to remove ice buildup. A deicing boot.
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(archaic) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.
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(Australia, UK, New Zealand, automotive) The luggage storage compartment of a sedan or saloon car.
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(computing, informal) The act or process of removing somebody from a chat room.
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(UK, slang) Unattractive person, ugly woman.
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(firearms) A hard plastic case for a long firearm, typically moulded to the shape of the gun and intended for use in a vehicle.
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To kick.

I booted the ball toward my teammate.

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To put boots on, especially for riding.
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To apply corporal punishment (compare slippering).
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(informal) To forcibly eject.

We need to boot those troublemakers as soon as possible.

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(slang) To vomit.

Sorry, I didn’t mean to boot all over your couch.

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(computing, informal) To disconnect forcibly; to eject from an online service, conversation, etc.
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(dated) Remedy, amends.
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(uncountable) Profit, plunder.
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To profit, avail, benefit.
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To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition.
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(computing) The act or process of bootstrapping; the starting or re-starting of a computing device.

It took three boots, but I finally got the application installed.

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(computing) To bootstrap; to start a system, eg. a computer, by invoking its boot process or bootstrap.

When arriving at the office, first thing I do is booting my machine.

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A bootleg recording.
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The definition of a boot is a type of shoe or foot covering that covers part of the leg as well.

An example of a boot is what cowboys wear on their feet.

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to boot
  • In addition; besides:.
    The new cruise ship was not only the biggest in the world, but the fastest to boot.
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to boot
  • Besides; in addition.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of boot

  • Middle English boten to be of help from Old English bōtian from bōt help bhad- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English bote from Old French
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English boote, bote (“shoe”), from Old French bote (“a high, thick shoe”). Of obscure origin, but probably related to Old French bot (“club-foot”), Old French bot (“fat, short, blunt”), probably from Old Norse buttr (“short, blunt”), from Proto-Germanic *buttaz, *butaz (“cut off, short, numb, blunt”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhud-, *bhAud-, *bheid- (“to strike, push, shock”). Compare Norwegian butt (“stump”), Low German butt (“blunt, plump”), Old English bytt (“small piece of land”), Old English buttuc (“end”). More at buttock.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English boote, bote, bot, from Old English bōt (“help, relief, advantage, remedy; compensation for an injury or wrong; (peace) offering, recompense, amends, atonement, reformation, penance, repentance”), from Proto-Germanic *bōtō (“atonement, improvement”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰÀd- (“good”). Akin to Old Norse bót (“bettering, remedy”) (Danish bod), Gothic (bota), German Buße.
    From Wiktionary
  • From bootleg (“to make or sell illegally”), by shortening
    From Wiktionary
  • Shortening of bootstrap.
    From Wiktionary