Kick meaning

kĭk
The definition of a kick is a hit with the foot.

An example of a kick is a strike to a soccer ball with one foot.

noun
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2
To strike with the foot.

Kicked the wall in frustration.

verb
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To spring back against suddenly.

The rifle kicked my shoulder when I fired it.

verb
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4
To kick is defined as to strike or hit with the foot or feet.

An example of to kick is to send a soccer ball into the goal.

verb
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3
To extend the leg away from the body; strike out with the foot or feet.
verb
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4
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(slang) A sudden, striking surprise; a twist.
noun
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0
(informal) A stimulating or intoxicating effect, as of alcoholic liquor.
noun
2
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To recoil.

The powerful rifle kicked upon being fired.

verb
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To propel by striking with the foot.

Kick a ball.

verb
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Any of various moves in dance in which the leg is extended from the body.
noun
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0
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A jolting recoil.

A rifle with a heavy kick.

noun
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(slang) A complaint; a protest.
noun
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(slang) Power; force.

A car engine with a lot of kick.

noun
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(slang) Temporary, often obsessive interest.

I'm on a science fiction kick.

noun
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To strike out with the foot or feet, as in anger, or in swimming, dancing, etc.
verb
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To spring back suddenly, as a gun when fired; recoil.
verb
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To bounce or ricochet, often in a way that is unexpected or seemingly erratic.

His tee shot kicked off to the right.

verb
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(informal) To object strongly; complain; grumble.
verb
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(football) To kick the ball.
verb
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To strike or shove suddenly with the foot or feet.
verb
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To drive or move (a ball, etc.) by striking with the foot.
verb
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To make or force (one's way, etc.) by kicking.
verb
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To score (a goal or point in football) by kicking.
verb
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A blow with or thrust of the foot.
noun
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A method of kicking.
noun
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A sudden, sharp thrust or jolt, as the recoil of a gun when fired.
noun
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A sudden burst of speed by a runner toward the end of a race.
noun
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(informal) An objection; complaint.
noun
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(informal) Pleasure; esp., pleasurable excitement.
noun
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(slang, old) A pocket.
noun
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An indentation at the bottom of a glass bottle, which reduces its capacity.
noun
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To strike or hit with the foot or other extremity of the leg.

Did you kick your brother?

verb
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(intransitive) To make a sharp jerking movement of the leg, as to strike something.

He enjoyed the simple pleasure of watching the kickline kick.

verb
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To direct to a particular place by a blow with the foot or leg.

Kick the ball into the goal.

verb
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(with "off" or "out") To eject summarily.
verb
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(Internet) To remove a participant from an online activity.

He was kicked by ChanServ for flooding.

verb
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(slang) To overcome (a bothersome or difficult issue or obstacle); to free onself of (a problem).

By taking that medication, he managed to get his triggered phobia of heights kicked.

I still smoke, but they keep telling me to kick the habit.

verb
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To move or push suddenly and violently.

He was kicked sideways by the force of the blast.

verb
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(of a firearm) To recoil; to push by recoiling.
verb
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A hit or strike with the leg or foot or knee.

A kick to the knee.

noun
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The action of swinging a foot or leg.

The ballerina did a high kick and a leap.

noun
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(colloquial) Something that tickles the fancy; something fun or amusing.

I finally saw the show. What a kick!

I think I sprained something on my latest exercise kick.

noun
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(Internet) The removal of a person from an online activity.
noun
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A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar device) whose only or main current function is that when it is pressed causes a video game character to kick.
noun
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(figuratively) Any bucking motion of an object that lacks legs or feet.

The car had a nasty kick the whole way.

The pool ball took a wild kick, up off the table.

noun
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(uncountable and countable) Piquancy.
noun
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A stimulation provided by an intoxicating substance.
noun
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(soccer) A pass played by kicking with the foot.
noun
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(soccer) The distance traveled by kicking the ball.

A long kick up the field.

noun
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A recoil of a gun.
noun
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(informal) Pocket.
noun
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An increase in speed in the final part of a running race.
noun
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(chess) To attack (a piece) in order to force it to move.
noun
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To die.
verb
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(sports) To score (a goal or point) by kicking a ball.
verb
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1
(vulgar slang) kick ass
  • To take forceful or harsh measures to achieve an objective.
idiom
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(slang) kick the bucket
  • To die.
idiom
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(slang) kick the habit
  • To free oneself of an addiction, as to narcotics or cigarettes.
idiom
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(informal) kick up (one's) heels
  • To cast off one's inhibitions and have a good time.
idiom
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(slang) kick upstairs
  • To promote to a higher yet less desirable position.
idiom
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(informal) kick around
  • to treat roughly
  • to move from place to place
  • to lie about unnoticed or forgotten
  • to think about or discuss informally
idiom
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(slang) kick ass
  • to use power or authority, as to force others into achieving a goal or goals
  • to punish, treat roughly, etc.
idiom
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0
kick back
  • to recoil suddenly and in an unexpected way
  • to give back (money) as a kickback
idiom
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kick down
  • to shift to a lower gear
idiom
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kick in
  • to pay (one's share)
  • to take effect
idiom
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0
kick off
  • to put a football into play with a kickoff
  • to start (a campaign, etc.)
  • to die
  • to depart; leave
idiom
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kick on
  • to begin operating
idiom
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kick oneself
  • to blame oneself severely
idiom
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kick out
  • to get rid of; expel; dismiss
  • to make a kick out of bounds
idiom
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kick over
  • to start up; turn over: said of an internal-combustion engine
idiom
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0
kick the can down the road
  • to put off doing something unpleasant or burdensome until a future time; procrastinate
idiom
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0
kick up
  • to raise by kicking
  • to make or cause (trouble, confusion, etc.)
idiom
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kick upstairs
  • to promote to a nominally higher level so as to be rid of on a lower, but more effective, level, as in a corporation
idiom
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on a kick
  • currently enthusiastic about a particular activity
idiom
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0

Origin of kick

  • Middle English kiken perhaps of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English kiken (“to strike out with the foot”), probably from Old Norse kikna (“to sink at the knees”) and keikja (“to bend backwards”) (compare Old Norse keikr (“bent backwards, the belly jutting forward”)), from Proto-Germanic *kaik-, *kaikaz (“bent backwards”), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *kī-, *kij- (“to split, dodge, swerve sidewards”), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeyǝ- (“to sprout, shoot”). Compare also Dutch kijken (“to look”), Middle Low German kīken (“to look, watch”). See keek.

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortening of kick the bucket

    From Wiktionary