Punch Definition

pŭnch
punched, punches, punching
noun
punches
A tool for circular or other piercing.
A leather punch.
American Heritage
A tool driven or pressed against a surface that is to be stamped, pierced, etc.
Webster's New World
A tool driven against a nail, bolt, etc. that is to be worked in, or against a pin that is to be worked out.
Webster's New World
A device or machine for making holes, cuts, etc.
A paper punch.
Webster's New World
The hole, cut, etc. made with a punch.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
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verb
punched, punches, punching
To make (a hole or opening), as by using a punch or similar implement.
American Heritage
To pierce, shape, stamp, cut, etc. with a punch.
Webster's New World
To pierce something; make a hole or opening.
My foot punched through the ice.
American Heritage
To drive (the fist) into or through something.
American Heritage
To drive (a ball, for example) with the fist.
American Heritage
Antonyms:
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idiom
beat to the punch
  • To make the first decisive move:

    a marketing team that beat all the competitors to the punch.

American Heritage
punch the clock
  • To register one's arrive or departure at a job.
  • To be employed at a job with regular hours.
American Heritage
pleased as Punch
  • Highly pleased; gratified.
American Heritage
beat to the punch
  • to be quicker than (another) in doing something, as in striking a blow
Webster's New World
pull one's punches
  • to deliver blows that are intentionally ineffective
  • to attack, criticize, etc. in an intentionally mild or ineffective manner
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Punch

Noun

Singular:
punch
Plural:
punches

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Punch

Origin of Punch

  • From Middle English punchen, partially from Old French ponchonner (“to punch"), from ponchon (“pointed tool"), from Latin punctus, perfect passive participle of pungō (“I prick"); and partially from Middle English punchen, a syncopated variant of Middle English punischen ("to punish"; see punish). Also influenced by Middle English punchon ("a punch"; see puncheon).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Hindi pañc- five probably as used in pañcāmr̥t a mixture of milk, yogurt, ghee, sugar, and honey used in Hindu ritual from Sanskrit pañcāmṛtam pañca five penkwe in Indo-European roots amṛtam amrita

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pounce, punche from Old French poinçon, ponchon puncheon1 V., from Middle English pouncen, punchen to prick from Old French poinçoner, ponchoner to emboss with a punch punch2

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English punchen to thrust, prod, prick from Old French poinçonner, ponchonner to emboss with a punch from poinçon, ponchon pointed tool puncheon1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Hindi पाँच (pāñć, “five"), because of the drink's original five ingredients (spirits, water, lemon juice, sugar, and spice), from Sanskrit पञ्चन् (páñcan).

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortened form of puncheon, from Old French ponchon (“pointed tool"), from Latin punctus, perfect passive participle of pungō (“I prick").

    From Wiktionary

  • Short for Punchinello

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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