Punch meaning

pŭnch
The definition of a punch is a device used for making holes or stamping, or a hard hit with the fist.

An example of a punch is a machine used for making holes in a belt.

An example of a punch is someone hitting a wall hard enough to make a hole.

noun
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To make (a hole or opening), as by using a punch or similar implement.
verb
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Punch is defined as to make a hole or stamp in something, or hit very hard with the fist.

An example of punch is using a tool shaped like a heart to cut hearts out of paper.

An example of punch is a boxer hitting another boxer in the face.

verb
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To hit (a ball) with a quick short swing.
verb
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A blow with the fist.
noun
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Impressive or effective force; impact.
noun
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A beverage of fruit juices and sometimes a soft drink or carbonated water, often spiced and mixed with a wine or liquor base.
noun
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The quarrelsome hook-nosed husband of Judy in the comic puppet show Punch and Judy.
noun
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A device or machine for making holes, cuts, etc.

A paper punch.

noun
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The hole, cut, etc. made with a punch.
noun
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To pierce, shape, stamp, cut, etc. with a punch.
verb
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To make (a hole, cut, etc.) with or as with a punch.
verb
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To prod or poke with a stick.
verb
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To herd or drive (cattle)
verb
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To strike with the fist.
verb
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To depress or push (a push button, a key on a keypad, etc.)
verb
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A thrusting blow with the fist.
noun
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Effective force; vigor.
noun
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A sweet drink made with fruit juices, carbonated beverages, sherbet, etc., often mixed with wine or liquor, and typically served in cups from a large bowl.
noun
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The main character, a hook-nosed and humpbacked figure, of a Punch-and-Judy show.
noun
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(countable) A hit or strike with one's fist.
noun
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(uncountable) Power, strength, energy.
noun
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(uncountable) Impact.
noun
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(countable) A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar device) whose only or main current function is that when it is pressed causes a video game character to punch.
noun
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To strike with one's fist.

If she punches me, I'm gonna break her nose.

verb
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(of cattle) To herd.
verb
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To operate (a device or system) by depressing a button, key, bar, or pedal, or by similar means.
verb
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To enter (information) on a device or system.
verb
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To hit (a ball or similar object) with less than full force.

He punched a hit into shallow left field.

verb
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To make holes in something (rail ticket, leather belt, etc)
verb
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To thrust against; to poke.

To punch one with the end of a stick or the elbow.

verb
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(countable) A device, generally slender and round, used for creating holes in thin material, for driving an object through a hole in a containing object, or to stamp or emboss a mark or design on a surface.
noun
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(countable) A mechanism for punching holes in paper or other thin material.
noun
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(countable) A hole or opening created with a punch.
noun
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(piledriving) An extension piece applied to the top of a pile; a dolly.
noun
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A prop, as for the roof of a mine.
noun
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To employ a punch to create a hole in or stamp or emboss a mark on something.
verb
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To mark a ticket.
verb
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(uncountable) A beverage, generally containing a mixture of fruit juice and some other beverage, often alcoholic.
noun
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A tool for circular or other piercing.

A leather punch.

noun
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A tool for forcing a pin, bolt, or rivet in or out of a hole.
noun
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A tool for stamping a design on a surface.
noun
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1
A tool for making a countersink.
noun
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To pierce something; make a hole or opening.

My foot punched through the ice.

verb
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To depress (the accelerator of a car) forcefully.
verb
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1
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beat to the punch
  • To make the first decisive move:.
    A marketing team that beat all the competitors to the punch.
idiom
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punch the clock
  • To register one's arrive or departure at a job.
  • To be employed at a job with regular hours.
idiom
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pleased as Punch
  • Highly pleased; gratified.
idiom
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beat to the punch
  • To be quicker than (another) in doing something, as in striking a blow.
idiom
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pull one's punches
  • To deliver blows that are intentionally ineffective.
  • To attack, criticize, etc. in an intentionally mild or ineffective manner.
idiom
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punch a (time) clock
  • To insert a timecard into a time clock when coming to or going from work.
idiom
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punch in
  • To record the time of one's arrival by means of a time clock.
  • To feed (data) as into a computer by pressing buttons or keys.
idiom
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punch out
  • To record the time of one's departure by means of a time clock.
  • To beat up.
idiom
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punch up
  • To beat up.
  • To enhance, accentuate, or heighten the effect of.
    To punch up a soup with spices.
idiom
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pleased as Punch
  • Greatly pleased or gratified.
idiom
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0

Origin of punch

  • From Hindi pañc- five probably as used in pañcāmr̥t a mixture of milk, yogurt, ghee, sugar, and honey used in Hindu ritual from Sanskrit pañcāmṛtam pañca five penkwe in Indo-European roots amṛtam amrita

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pounce, punche from Old French poinçon, ponchon puncheon1 V., from Middle English pouncen, punchen to prick from Old French poinçoner, ponchoner to emboss with a punch punch2

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English punchen to thrust, prod, prick from Old French poinçonner, ponchonner to emboss with a punch from poinçon, ponchon pointed tool puncheon1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for Punchinello

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English punchen, partially from Old French ponchonner (“to punch"), from ponchon (“pointed tool"), from Latin punctus, perfect passive participle of pungō (“I prick"); and partially from Middle English punchen, a syncopated variant of Middle English punischen ("to punish"; see punish). Also influenced by Middle English punchon ("a punch"; see puncheon).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Hindi पाँच (pāñć, “five"), because of the drink's original five ingredients (spirits, water, lemon juice, sugar, and spice), from Sanskrit पञ्चन् (páñcan).

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortened form of puncheon, from Old French ponchon (“pointed tool"), from Latin punctus, perfect passive participle of pungō (“I prick").

    From Wiktionary