Push meaning

po͝osh
A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score.
noun
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The definition of a push is the act of putting pressure on someone or something to get action.

An example of a push is a potential employer offering a car allowance to sweeten a job offer.

An example of a push is using a shove on the back of a sled to get it started downhill.

noun
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Push is defined as to press, force or urge a person or thing to move or go away.

An example of push is pressing the button for an elevator.

An example of push is putting your weight against a couch to move it across the room.

verb
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To urge forward or urge insistently; pressure.

Pushed him to study harder.

verb
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(informal) To approach in age.

Is pushing 40 and still hasn't settled down.

verb
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A thing to be pushed so as to work a mechanism.
noun
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A provocation to action; a stimulus.

Has artistic talent but needs a push to get started.

noun
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(informal) Persevering energy; enterprise.

Doesn't have the push to get the job done.

noun
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(informal) To be near or close to.

Pushing seventy years of age.

verb
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(baseball, golf) To hit (the ball) and make it go to the right or, if one is left-handed, to the left.
verb
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To press against a thing so as to move it.
verb
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To put forth great effort, as in seeking advancement.
verb
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To move forward against opposition.
verb
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To move by being pushed.
verb
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The act of pushing.
noun
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A vigorous effort, campaign, etc.
noun
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An advance against opposition.
noun
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Pressure of affairs or of circumstances.
noun
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An emergency.
noun
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(informal) Aggressiveness; enterprise; drive.
noun
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In the World Wide Web, a technology that initiates content transmissions to users who have registered or subscribed to a service, relieving them of the requirement to initiate access to a Web site to retrieve that content, or "pull" it down. See also pull and World Wide Web.
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(intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.

In his anger he pushed me against the wall and threatened me.

You need to push quite hard to get this door open.

verb
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To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.
verb
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To press or urge forward; to drive.

To push an objection too far; to push one's luck.

verb
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To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).

Stop pushing the issue "” I'm not interested.

They're pushing that perfume again.

There were two men hanging around the school gates today, pushing drugs.

verb
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(informal) To approach; to come close to.

My old car is pushing 250,000 miles.

He's pushing sixty. (= he's nearly sixty years old)

verb
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(intransitive) To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.

During childbirth, there are times when the obstetrician advises the woman not to push.

verb
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(intransitive) To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.
verb
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To make a higher bid at an auction.
verb
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(poker) To make an all-in bet.
verb
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(chess) To move (a pawn) directly forward.
verb
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(computing) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.
verb
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To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.
verb
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A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.

Give the door a hard push if it sticks.

noun
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An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.

One more push and the baby will be out.

noun
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A great effort (to do something).

Some details got lost in the push to get the project done.

Let's give one last push on our advertising campaign.

noun
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(military) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.
noun
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(computing) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.
noun
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(Internet, uncountable) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in server push, push technology.
noun
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(dated) A crowd or throng or people.
noun
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(obsolete, UK, dialect) A pustule; a pimple.

noun
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To extend or enlarge.

Pushed sales into the millions.

verb
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(sports) To hit (a ball) in the direction toward the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the right of a right-handed player.
verb
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To advance despite difficulty or opposition; press forward.

The regiment pushed toward the front line.

verb
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To advocate or recommend something insistently.

Pushed for a change in leadership.

verb
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To expend great or vigorous effort.

Pushed to finish his paper by the deadline.

verb
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To force (one's way).

We pushed our way through the crowd.

verb
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To exert pressure or force against something.

Winds pushing against the sail.

verb
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A vigorous or insistent effort toward an end; a drive.

A push to reform health care.

noun
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To bring into a critical state; esp., to make critically in need.

To be pushed for time.

verb
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To urge or promote the use, sale, success, etc. of.
verb
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(informal) push paper
  • To have one's time taken up by administrative, often seemingly petty, paperwork:
    Spent the afternoon pushing paper for the boss.
idiom
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(slang) push up daisies
  • To be dead and buried:
    A cemetery of heroes pushing up daisies.
idiom
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when
  • At a point when the situation must be confronted and dealt with:
    When push comes to shove, we'll have to move to a cheaper place.
idiom
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push comes to shove
  • matters become serious or reach a critical point where some action or decision is required
idiom
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push off
  • to move a boat, etc. out into the water by pushing, as with an oar, against the bank or pier
  • to set out; depart
idiom
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push on
  • to proceed; continue advancing
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

push paper
push comes to shove

Origin of push

  • Middle English pusshen from Old French poulser, pousser from Latin pulsāre frequentative of pellere to strike, push pel-5 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pushen, poshen, posson, from Middle French pousser (Modern French pousser) from Old French poulser, from Latin pulsare, frequentative of pellere (past participle pulsus) "to beat, strike". Displaced native Middle English thrucchen (“to push") (from Old English þryccan (“to push")), Middle English scauten (“to push, thrust") (from Old Norse skota), Middle English schoven (“to push, shove") (from Old English scofian), Middle English schuven (“to shove, push") (from Old English scÅ«fan, scÄ“ofan (“to shove, push, thrust")), Middle English thuden, thudden (“to push, press, thrust") (from Old English þȳdan, þyddan (“to thrust, press, push")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably French poche. See pouch.

    From Wiktionary