Blow definition

blō
The act or an instance of blowing.
noun
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The definition of a blow is a hard hit or upsetting news, or receiving upsetting information.

An example of blow is when you are hit by a baseball in the head.

An example of a blow is when you were expecting to go on a trip and you find out the plane has been cancelled and the hotel burned down.

noun
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To cause air to come from (a bellows, blower, etc.)
verb
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(informal) An act of bragging.
noun
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To blow is to expel air in a more forceful manner or air movement.

An example of blow is when you use your mouth to expel air to make the candles on your birthday cake go out.

An example of blow is when the wind comes along and causes the leaves to move in the trees.

verb
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To melt (a fuse, etc.)
verb
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To expel a current of air, as from the mouth or from a bellows.
verb
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To produce a sound by expelling a current of air, as in sounding a wind instrument or a whistle.
verb
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To release air or gas suddenly; burst or explode.

The tire blew when it hit the pothole.

verb
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(informal) To boast.
verb
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(vulgar slang) To be disgustingly disagreeable or offensive.

This movie blows.

verb
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To be in a state of motion. Used of the air or of wind.
verb
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To move along or be carried by the wind.

Her hat blew away.

verb
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To move with or have strong winds.

The storm blew all night.

verb
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To breathe hard; pant.
verb
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To spout moist air from the blowhole. Used of a whale.
verb
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To fail or break down, as from being operated under extreme or improper conditions.

The furnace blew during the cold snap.

verb
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To melt or otherwise become disabled. Used of a fuse.
verb
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(informal) To move very fast in relation to something.

The boy blew past the stands on his bike.

verb
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(slang) To go away; depart.

It's time to blow.

verb
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To demolish by the force of an explosion.

An artillery shell blew our headquarters apart.

verb
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To lay or deposit eggs in. Used of certain insects.
verb
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To cause to move by means of a current of air.

The wind blew the boat out to sea.

verb
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To drive a current of air on, in, or through.

Blew my hair dry after I shampooed it.

verb
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To clear out or make free of obstruction by forcing air through.

Blew his nose all through allergy season.

verb
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To shape or form (glass, for example) by forcing air or gas through at the end of a pipe.
verb
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To expel (air) from the mouth.
verb
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To cause air or gas to be expelled suddenly from.

We blew a tire when we drove over the rock.

verb
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To cause (a wind instrument) to sound.
verb
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To sound.

A bugle blowing taps.

verb
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To cause to be out of breath.
verb
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To allow (a winded horse) to regain its breath.
verb
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To cause to fail or break down, as by operating at extreme or improper conditions.

Blew the engine on the last lap.

verb
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To cause (a fuse) to melt or become disabled.
verb
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To spend (money) freely and rashly.
verb
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To spend money freely on; treat.

Blew me to a sumptuous dinner.

verb
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(slang) To spoil or lose through ineptitude.

Blew the audition; blew a three-goal lead.

verb
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To cause (a covert intelligence operation or operative) to be revealed and thereby jeopardized.

A story in the press that blew their cover; an agent who was blown by the opposition.

verb
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(slang) To depart (a place) in a great hurry.

Let's blow this city no later than noon.

verb
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(baseball) To throw (a pitch) so fast that a batter cannot swing fast enough to hit it.

Blew a fastball by the batter for the strikeout.

verb
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A storm.
noun
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An unexpected shock or calamity.
noun
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An unexpected attack; an assault.
noun
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To bloom or cause to bloom.
verb
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A mass of blossoms.

Peach blow.

noun
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The state of blossoming.

Tulips in full blow.

noun
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To move with some force.
verb
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To send forth air with or as with the mouth.
verb
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To pant; be breathless.
verb
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To make or give sound by blowing or being blown.
verb
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To exhale air and condensed moisture from the lungs in a spout through the blowhole.
verb
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To be carried by the wind or a current of air.

The paper blew away.

verb
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To be stormy.
verb
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To burst or explode.
verb
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To disrupt a circuit by melting.
verb
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To lay eggs.
verb
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(informal) To brag; boast.
verb
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(slang) To go away; leave.
verb
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(slang, jazz) To improvise.
verb
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(slang) To cease functioning, esp. by overuse.
verb
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(slang) To be contemptible or very unsatisfying, as because of low quality.

This concert blows.

verb
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To send out (breath, tobacco smoke, etc.) from the mouth.
verb
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To force air onto, into, or through.
verb
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To drive by blowing.

Dead leaves were blown by the wind.

verb
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To cool, warm, dry, or soothe by blowing on or toward.
verb
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To shape or form (glass, soap bubbles, etc.) by blown air or gas.
verb
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To clean or clear by blowing through.

To blow one's nose.

verb
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To cause to burst or break by an explosion.
verb
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To cause (a horse) to pant.
verb
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To lay or deposit eggs in.
verb
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(informal) To spend (money) freely or wastefully; squander.
verb
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(informal) To treat (to something)
verb
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(informal) To forget or fluff (one's lines) in a show.
verb
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(slang) To go away from; leave.

He blew town.

verb
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(slang) To bungle and fail in.

We had our chance and blew it.

verb
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(slang) To damn.
verb
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(slang) To inhale (cocaine, marijuana, etc.)
verb
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(slang) To reveal or disclose, esp. so as to compromise.

They blew our cover.

verb
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(slang) To cause (an engine, transmission, etc.) to cease functioning, esp. by overuse.
verb
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To sound (a wind instrument) by blowing.
verb
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To make (a sound or signal) by blowing.
verb
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The act of blowing.
noun
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A blast of air.
noun
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A strong wind; gale.
noun
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A boast.
noun
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noun
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(slang) A pause, as to catch one's breath or relax; breather.
noun
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The blast of air forced through molten metal to remove impurities.
noun
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The time or stage in metal refining in which the blast of air is forced through molten metal.
noun
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The amount of metal that is refined during this time.
noun
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A hard hit or stroke with the fist, a weapon, etc.
noun
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A sudden attack or forcible effort.
noun
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Any sudden calamity or misfortune; shock.
noun
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To blossom.
verb
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A mass of blossoms.
noun
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The state of flowering.
noun
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(now chiefly dialectal, Northern England) Blue.
adjective
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(intransitive) To produce an air current.
verb
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To propel by an air current.

Blow the dust off that book and open it up.

verb
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(intransitive) To be propelled by an air current.

The leaves blow through the streets in the fall.

verb
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To create or shape by blowing; as in to blow bubbles, to blow glass.
verb
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To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means.

To blow the fire.

verb
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To clear of contents by forcing air through.

To blow an egg.

To blow one's nose.

verb
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To cause to make sound by blowing, as a musical instrument.
verb
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(intransitive) To make a sound as the result of being blown.

In the harbor, the ships' horns blew.

verb
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(intransitive, of a cetacean) To exhale visibly through the spout the seawater which it has taken in while feeding.

There's nothing more thrilling to the whale watcher than to see a whale surface and blow.

There she blows! (i.e. "I see a whale spouting!")

verb
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(intransitive) To explode.

Get away from that burning gas tank! It's about to blow!

verb
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(with "up" or with prep phrase headed by "to") To cause to explode, shatter, or be utterly destroyed.

The demolition squad neatly blew the old hotel up.

The aerosol can was blown to bits.

verb
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To cause sudden destruction of.

He blew the tires and the engine.

verb
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(intransitive) To suddenly fail destructively.

He tried to sprint, but his ligaments blew and he was barely able to walk to the finish line.

verb
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(intransitive, slang) To be very undesirable (see also suck).

This blows!

verb
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(slang) To recklessly squander.

I managed to blow $1000 at blackjack in under an hour.

I blew $35 thou on a car.

We blew an opportunity to get benign corporate sponsorship.

verb
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(vulgar) To fellate.

Who did you have to blow to get those backstage passes?

verb
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To leave.

Let's blow this joint.

verb
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To make flyblown, to defile, especially with fly eggs.
verb
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Whiting.

His language does his knowledge blow.

verb
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(intransitive) To breathe hard or quick; to pant; to puff.
verb
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To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue.

To blow a horse.

verb
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A strong wind.

We're having a bit of a blow this afternoon.

noun
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(informal) A chance to catch one’s breath.

The players were able to get a blow during the last timeout.

noun
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(uncountable, US, slang) Cocaine.
noun
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(uncountable, UK, slang) Cannabis.
noun
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(uncountable, US Chicago Regional, slang) Heroin.
noun
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The act of striking or hitting.

A fabricator is used to direct a sharp blow to the surface of the stone.

During an exchange to end round 13, Duran landed a blow to the midsection.

noun
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A sudden or forcible act or effort; an assault.
noun
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A further blow to the group came in 1917 when Thomson died while canoeing in Algonquin Park.

noun
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To blossom; to cause to bloom or blossom.
verb
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A mass or display of flowers; a yield.
noun
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A display of anything brilliant or bright.
noun
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A bloom, state of flowering.

Roses in full blow.

noun
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(slang) Cocaine.
noun
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A blast of air or wind.
noun
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A sudden hard stroke or hit, as with the fist or an object.
noun
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(slang) blow a fuse
  • To explode with anger.
idiom
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blow hot and cold
  • To change one's opinion often on a matter; vacillate.
idiom
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blow off steam
  • To give vent to pent-up emotion.
idiom
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(slang) blow (one's) cool
  • To lose one's composure.
idiom
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(slang) blow (one's) mind
  • To affect with intense emotion, such as amazement, excitement, or shock.
idiom
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(informal) blow (one's) top
  • To lose one's temper.
idiom
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blow
  • To get a sudden, insurmountable lead in (an athletic contest).
idiom
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blow out of proportion
  • To make more of than is reasonable; exaggerate.
idiom
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blow smoke
  • To speak deceptively.
  • To brag or exaggerate.
idiom
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blow a kiss
  • to gesture affectionately to a person some distance away by puckering and smacking the lips or, esp., by kissing one's palm or fingers and then waving the hand in his or her direction
    They blew kisses to their friends on shore.
idiom
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(slang) blow someone away
  • to kill by shooting
  • to overcome with emotion, surprise, etc.
idiom
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blow dead
  • to suspend (a play) by signaling with a whistle
idiom
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blow hot and cold
  • to be favorable toward something and then opposed to it; vacillate
idiom
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blow in
  • to arrive
idiom
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blow someone's mind
  • to astound, amaze, confuse, etc.
idiom
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blow off
  • to let steam or hot water out from (a boiler)
  • to give vent to one's feelings, as by loud or long talking
  • to ignore, disregard, or reject
idiom
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blow out
  • to put out (a fire or flame) by blowing
  • to be put out in this way
  • to dispel (itself) after a time
idiom
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blow over
  • to move away, as rain clouds
  • to pass over or by; be forgotten
idiom
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blow one's stack
  • to lose one's temper; fly into a rage
idiom
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blow up
  • to fill with or as with air or gas
  • to burst or explode
  • to arise and become more intense, as a storm
  • to enlarge (a photograph)
  • to exaggerate (an incident, rumor, etc.)
  • to lose one's temper or poise
idiom
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at a (or one) blow
  • by one action
idiom
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come to blows
  • to begin fighting one another
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
blow
Plural:
blows

Origin of blow

  • From Middle English blowen to bloom from Old English blōwan bhel-3 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English blowen from Old English blāwan bhlē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English blaw

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English blowen, from Old English blāwan (“to blow, breathe, inflate, sound”), from Proto-Germanic *blēaną (“to blow”) (compare German blähen), from Proto-Indo-European *bhle- (“to swell, blow up”) (compare Latin flare (“to blow”), Old Armenian բեղուն (bełun, “fertile”), Albanian plas (“to blow, explode”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English blo, bloo, from Old English blāw (“blue”), from Proto-Germanic *blēwaz (“blue, dark blue, grey, black”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlēw- (“yellow, blond, grey”). Cognate with Latin flavus (“yellow”). More at blue.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English blowen, from Old English blōwan, from Proto-Germanic *blōaną (compare Dutch bloeien, German blühen), from Proto-Indo-European *bhel- 'to thrive, bloom' (compare Latin florēre 'to bloom').

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English blowe, blaw, northern variant of blēwe, from Proto-Germanic *blewwaną 'to beat' (compare Old Norse blegði 'wedge', German bläuen, Middle Dutch blouwen). Related to block.

    From Wiktionary