Snow meaning

snō
Snow means particles of frozen water vapor, a mass of this substance or something that resembles this substance, or is slang for cocaine or heroin.

An example of snow is the white fluff that falls from the sky during the winter in New York.

An example of snow is are the spots on a television screen when the transmission signal is not strong.

noun
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Particles of water vapor which when frozen in the upper air fall to earth as soft, white, crystalline flakes.
noun
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1
To overwhelm with insincere talk, especially with flattery.
verb
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Fluctuating spots appearing on a television screen as a result of a weak signal, shot effect, etc.
noun
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To fall as or like snow.
verb
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A mass or accumulation of fallen snow.
noun
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(uncountable) A shade of the color white.

noun
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(uncountable) The area of frequency on a television which has no programmes broadcast in analogue sets, the image is created by the Electrical noise.
noun
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(uncountable, slang) Cocaine.
noun
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(countable) A snowfall; a blanket of frozen, crystalline water.

We have had several heavy snows this year.

noun
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To fall as or in snow.
verb
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To cover, shut off, or close off with snow.

We were snowed in.

verb
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Whiteness.
noun
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Something like snow in whiteness, texture, etc.
noun
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Cocaine or heroin.
noun
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To shower or let fall as or like snow.
verb
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To cover, obstruct, etc. with or as with snow.
verb
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To deceive, mislead, or win over by glib talk, flattery, etc.
verb
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Baron Snow of Leicester 1905-80; Eng. novelist & physicist.
proper name
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Precipitation that falls to earth in the form of ice crystals that have complex branched hexagonal patterns. Snow usually falls from stratus and stratocumulus clouds, but it can also fall from cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds.
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The flickering snow-like spots on a video screen caused by display electronics that are too slow to respond to changing data.
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(uncountable) The frozen, crystalline state of water that falls as precipitation.
noun
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(colloquial) To hoodwink someone, especially by presenting confusing information.
verb
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(poker) To bluff in draw poker by refusing to draw any cards.
verb
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(nautical) A square-rigged vessel, differing from a brig only in that she has a trysail mast close abaft the mainmast, on which a large trysail is hoisted.
noun
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
noun
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Snow is defined as to shower, fall or cover with a frozen water vapor substance from the sky, or to say or do something to deceive someone.

An example of snow is for this substance to come down from the sky on Christmas.

An example of snow is for someone who is interviewing for a job to tell the interviewer about experience which they don't have.

verb
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Frozen precipitation in the form of white or translucent hexagonal ice crystals that fall in soft, white flakes.
noun
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A falling of snow; a snowstorm.
noun
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Something resembling snow, as:
  • The white specks on a television screen resulting from weak reception.
  • Cocaine.
  • Heroin.
noun
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(uncountable) Any similar frozen form of a gas or liquid.
noun
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(impersonal) To have snow fall from the sky.

It is snowing.

It started to snow.

verb
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snow under
  • To weigh down or overwhelm with work, etc.
  • To defeat decisively.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of snow

  • Middle English from Old English snāw sneigwh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English snow, snaw, from Old English snāw (“snow"), from Proto-Germanic *snaiwaz (“snow"), from Proto-Indo-European *snóygÊ·Ê°os (“snow"). Cognate with Scots snaw (“snow"), West Frisian snie (“snow"), Dutch sneeuw (“snow"), German Schnee (“snow"), Danish sne (“snow"), Norwegian snø (“snow"), Swedish snö (“snow"), Icelandic snjór (“snow"), Latin nix (“snow"), Russian снег (sneg), Armenian Õ±ÕµÕ¸Ö‚Õ¶ (jyun), Ancient Greek νίφα (nípha), dialectal Albanian nehë (“place where the snow melts"). Also, from the same Indo-European root *sneygÊ·Ê°- (“to snow") comes English snew.
    From Wiktionary
  • Low German Snaue, or Dutch snaauw, from Low German Snau (“a snout, a beak").
    From Wiktionary