Calm meaning

käm
The definition of calm is someone or something who is peaceful and free from stress or worries.

An example of peaceful is a warm, quiet summer day.

adjective
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To calm means to soothe and pacify someone to make him free of stress, or to become free of stress yourself.

An example of calm is what you are doing when you rock a baby to try to make him stop crying and fussing.

An example of calm is the change in the atmosphere when a baby gradually stops crying and fussing.

verb
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Calm is defined as a state of peace and tranquility.

An example of calm is an atmosphere where no one is fighting or arguing and there is no stress or tension.

noun
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Nearly or completely motionless; undisturbed.

The calm surface of the lake.

adjective
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Lack of agitation or excitement; tranquillity; serenity.
noun
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A period of time without wind.
noun
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Not excited or agitated; composed.

The president was calm throughout the global crisis.

adjective
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Lack of wind or motion; stillness.
noun
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(meteorol.) A condition in which the air movement is less than one mile per hour.
noun
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Without wind or motion; still; quiet.
adjective
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Not agitated or excited; tranquil.
adjective
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To make or become calm.
verb
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(of a place or situation) Free of noise and disturbance.
adjective
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(of water) With little waves on the surface.
adjective
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(in a person) The state of being calm; peacefulness; absence of worry, anger, fear or other strong negative emotion.
noun
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(in a place or situation) The state of being calm; absence of noise and disturbance.
noun
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To make calm.

To calm a crying baby.

To calm the passions.

verb
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(intransitive) To become calm.
verb
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To make or become calm or quiet.

A warm bath will calm you. After the storm, the air calmed.

verb
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(of a person) Peaceful, quiet, especially free from anger and anxiety.
adjective
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Tranquility or serenity.
noun
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Origin of calm

  • Middle English calme from Old French from Old Italian calmo from Late Latin cauma heat of the day, resting place in the heat of the day from Greek kauma burning heat from kaiein to burn N., from Middle English calme from Italian calma from Vulgar Latin calma from Late Latin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French calme, from Old Italian calma. Calma may derive from Latin cauma (“heat of the midday sun”), from Ancient Greek καῦμα (kauma, “heat, especially of the sun”), from καίω (kaiō, “I burn”), or possibly from Latin caleō, from Ancient Greek (Doric) κάλεoς (kaleos) (of the Ionic κήλεος (kēleos, “burning”)).

    From Wiktionary