Mad definition

măd
To make or become mad; madden.
verb
16
1
Angry; resentful.

Was mad about the broken vase.

adjective
17
4
Mutually assured destruction.
abbreviation
8
1
Extremely; very.

This place is mad cool.

adverb
4
0
Mentally ill; insane.
adjective
4
0
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Wildly excited or disorderly; frenzied; frantic.

Mad with fear.

adjective
3
0
Blindly and foolishly enthusiastic or fond; infatuated.

To be mad about clothes.

adjective
3
1
The definition of mad is defined as angry, insane, foolish, frantic or extremely funny.

An example of mad is child who is not able to do what he wants to do.

An ecxample of mad is a psychopath.

An example of mad is a plan to rob a police station.

An example of mad is someone getting worked up about possibly getting into trouble.

An example of mad is the comedy of George Carlin.

adjective
1
0
Showing or resulting from lack of reason; foolish and rash; unwise.

A mad scheme.

adjective
1
0
Extremely foolish or unwise; irrational; imprudent.
adjective
1
0
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(colloquial, usually with for or about) Extremely enthusiastic about; crazy about; infatuated with; overcome with desire for.

Aren't you just mad for that red dress?

adjective
1
0
(slang, chiefly Northeastern US) Intensifier, signifies an abundance or high quality of a thing; very, much or many.

I gotta give you mad props for scoring us those tickets. Their lead guitarist has mad skills. There's always mad girls at those parties.

adjective
1
0
Exhibiting uncharacteristic aggressiveness, especially as a result of rabies, spongiform encephalopathy, or another neurological disease. Used of animals.

A mad dog; a mad cow.

adjective
0
0
Mentally deranged.
adjective
0
0
Characteristic of mental derangement.

Mad laughter.

adjective
0
0
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Temporarily or apparently deranged by violent sensations, emotions, or ideas.

Was mad with jealousy.

adjective
0
0
Lacking restraint or reason; foolish.

I was mad to have hired her in the first place.

adjective
0
0
Feeling or showing strong liking or enthusiasm.

Mad about sports.

adjective
0
0
Marked by a lack of restraint, especially by extreme excitement, confusion, or agitation.

A mad scramble for the bus.

adjective
0
0
Excellent; wonderful.

It's really mad that they can come.

adjective
0
0
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Abundant; great.

Mad respect.

adjective
0
0
Wildly amusing; hilarious.

A mad comedy.

adjective
0
0
Having rabies.

A mad dog.

adjective
0
0
Angry or provoked.
adjective
0
0
Showing or expressing anger.
adjective
0
0
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(archaic) To madden.
verb
0
0
An angry or sullen mood or fit.
noun
0
0
The theory that the possession of equally devastating nuclear weapons by superpowers will deter each from attacking another or its allies.
noun
0
0
(chiefly UK) Insane; crazy, mentally deranged.

You want to spend $1000 on a pair of shoes? Are you mad?

He's got this mad idea that he's irresistible to women.

adjective
0
0
(chiefly US; UK dated + regional) Angry, annoyed.

Are you mad at me?

adjective
0
0
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(of a compass needle) Having impaired polarity.
adjective
0
0
(slang, New England, New York and UK, dialect) Intensifier; to a large degree; extremely; exceedingly; very; unbelievably.

He was driving mad slow.

It's mad hot today.

He seems mad keen on her.

adverb
0
0
(now colloquial US) To madden, to anger, to frustrate.
verb
0
0
Wildly confused or excited.

To be mad with terror, lust, or hatred.

adjective
0
1
(of animals) Abnormally ferocious or furious; or, rabid, affected with rabies.

A mad dog.

adjective
0
1
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(informal) like mad
  • Wildly; impetuously:
    Drove like mad.
  • To an intense degree or great extent:
    Worked like mad; snowing like mad.
idiom
0
0
mad as a hatter
  • Crazy; mentally deranged.
idiom
1
0
have a mad on
  • to be angry
idiom
1
0
mad as a hatter
  • completely crazy
idiom
1
0

Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
mad
Comparative:
madder
Superlative:
maddest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of mad

  • Middle English mentally deranged, rabid, angry from Old English gemǣdde past participle of gemǣdan to derange mentally, madden from gemād mentally deranged mei-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English medd, madd, from Old English gemÇ£d (“enraged"), from gemād (“silly, mad"), from Proto-Germanic *maidaz (compare Old High German gimeit (“foolish, crazy"), Gothic gamaiþs (gamaiþs, “crippled")), past participle of *maidijanÄ… (“to cripple, injure"), from Proto-Indo-European *mei (“to change") (compare Old Irish máel (“bald, dull"), Old Lithuanian ap-maitinti (“to wound"), Sanskrit [script?] (méthati, “he hurts, comes to blows")).

    From Wiktionary