Ecstasy meaning

ĕkstə-sē
Frequency:
Intense joy or delight.
noun
17
1
A state of emotion so intense that one is carried beyond rational thought and self-control.

An ecstasy of rage.

noun
11
2
The trance, frenzy, or rapture associated with mystic or prophetic exaltation.
noun
8
3
A feeling of overpowering joy; great delight; rapture.
noun
4
2
(slang) An illegal, mildly psychedelic derivative of amphetamine, C11H15NO2, that slows down reactions and thought; MDMA.
noun
3
2
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A state of being overpowered by emotion, as by joy, grief, or passion.

An ecstasy of delight.

noun
3
3
A trance, esp. one resulting from religious fervor.
noun
3
4
(slang) MDMA.
noun
2
1
(slang) MDMA.
noun
2
2
Ecstasy is defined as the psychedelic drug MDMA.

An example of ecstasy is what club kids use to dance all night.

noun
0
0
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The definition of ecstasy is a feeling of intense joy, happiness or passion.

An example of ecstasy is a soldier being reunited with his family.

noun
0
0
noun
0
0
A state of emotion so intense that a person is carried beyond rational thought and self-control.
noun
0
0
A trance, frenzy, or rapture associated with mystic or prophetic exaltation.
noun
0
0
Marlowe.

Our words will but increase his ecstasy.

noun
0
0
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(slang) The drug MDMA, a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family.
noun
0
0
(medicine, dated) A state in which sensibility, voluntary motion, and (largely) mental power are suspended; the body is erect and inflexible; but the pulse and breathing are not affected.

noun
0
0
(slang) The drug MDMA, a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family.
pronoun
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
ecstasy
Plural:
ecstasies

Origin of ecstasy

  • Middle English extasie from Old French from Late Latin extasis terror from Greek ekstasis astonishment, distraction from existanai to displace, derange ek- out of ecto– histanai to place stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French estaise (“ecstasy, rapture”), from Late Latin extasis, from Ancient Greek ἔκστασις (ekstasis), from ἐξίστημι (eksistēmi, “I displace”), from ἐκ (ek, “out”) and ἵστημι (histēmi, “I stand”).

    From Wiktionary