Trouble meaning

trŭbəl
A condition of pain, disease, or malfunction.

Heart trouble; car trouble.

noun
6
1
Trouble is defined as problems, misfortunes or misbehaving, or a situation that causes worries.

When your car engine is failing, this is an example of trouble.

When you disobey, this is an example of trouble.

When you are worried about the state of your finances, this is an example of money trouble.

noun
4
2
To cause mental agitation to; worry; harass; perturb; vex.
verb
3
0
To take pains.

They trouble over every detail.

verb
3
1
To trouble is to cause pain, distress or worry.

When you act in a way that makes your mother concerned about you, this is an example of a situation where you trouble your mother.

verb
3
2
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To disturb or agitate.

Troubled waters.

verb
2
0
To cause pain or discomfort to; afflict.

My back troubled me.

verb
2
0
To cause difficulty or inconvenience to; incommode.

Don't trouble yourself to rise.

verb
2
0
To pester, annoy, tease, bother, etc.
verb
2
0
To make an effort; take pains; bother.

Don't trouble to return it.

verb
2
0
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A state of mental distress; worry.
noun
2
0
A distressful or dangerous situation.

He was in trouble when the rain started.

noun
2
0
Liability to punishment; conflict with authority.

He had some trouble with the law.

noun
2
0
A state of distress, affliction, difficulty, or need.

Tried to console them in their trouble; got in trouble with the police.

noun
2
1
A cause or source of distress, disturbance, or difficulty.

The new recruits were a trouble to him.

noun
2
1
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Effort, especially when inconvenient or bothersome.

Went to a lot of trouble to find this book.

noun
2
1
To afflict with pain or discomfort.

My stomach is troubling me.

verb
2
1
To agitate; stir up.

Winds troubling the waters.

verb
2
1
To inconvenience; bother.

May I trouble you for directions?

verb
1
0
A person, circumstance, or event that causes annoyance, distress, difficulty, etc.
noun
1
0
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Public disturbance; civil disorder.
noun
1
0
Effort; bother; pains.

To take the trouble to look it up.

noun
1
0
An illness; ailment; disease.
noun
1
0
A difficulty, problem, condition, or action contributing to such a situation.

The trouble was a leaking brake line. The trouble with that suggestion is that we lack the funds to put it in motion. The bridge column magnified the trouble with a slight tilt in the wrong direction.

noun
1
0
A violent occurrence or event.

The troubles in Northern Ireland.

noun
1
0
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Efforts taken or expended, typically beyond the normal required.

It's no trouble for me to edit it.

noun
1
0

He's been in hospital with some heart trouble. My old car has engine trouble.

noun
1
0
(mining) A fault or interruption in a stratum.
noun
1
0
(now rare) To disturb, stir up, agitate (a medium, especially water).
verb
1
0
To mentally distress; to cause (someone) to be anxious or perplexed.
verb
1
0
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In weaker sense: to bother; to annoy, pester.

Question 3 in the test is troubling me.

I will not trouble you to deliver the letter.

verb
1
0
(reflexive or intransitive) To take pains to do something.
verb
1
0
A distressing or difficult circumstance or situation.

I've had troubles ever since I took this job.

noun
1
1
in trouble
  • pregnant when unmarried
idiom
1
0
the Troubles
  • the civil unrest in Ireland, c. 1919-23
  • the civil unrest in Northern Ireland, from about 1967
idiom
1
0
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trouble someone for
  • to ask someone to pass, hand, give, etc. (something) to one
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

trouble someone for

Origin of trouble

  • Middle English from Old French from troubler to trouble from Vulgar Latin turbulāre alteration (influenced by Latin turbula small group) (diminutive of turba crowd) of Late Latin turbidāre from Latin turbidus confused turbid

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Verb is from Middle English troublen, trublen, turblen, troble, from Old French troubler, trobler, trubler, metethetic variants of Old French tourbler, torbler, turbler, from Medieval Latin *turbulāre, from Latin turbula (“disorderly group, a little crowd or people"), diminutive of turba (“stir, crowd"). The noun is from Middle English truble, troble, from Old French troble, from the verb.

    From Wiktionary