While meaning

wīl, hwīl
While is defined as during or in a certain time.

An example of while is cookies baking during the same time that caramel is being made on the stove top.

conjunction
6
0
A period or space of time.

A short while.

noun
6
1
To spend (time) idly or pleasantly.

While the hours away.

verb
3
1
A period of time.

Stay for a while; sang all the while.

noun
1
0

This case, while interesting, is a bit frustrating.

conjunction
1
0
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While means a period of time.

An example of while is how long a person has to wait for to see the doctor.

noun
1
1
But; however.

The soles are leather, while the uppers are canvas.

conjunction
1
1
During or throughout the time that.

We waited while she dined.

conjunction
1
1
The time, effort, or trouble taken in doing something.

The project wasn't worth my while.

noun
0
0
As long as; during the time that.

It was lovely while it lasted.

conjunction
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0
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In spite of the fact that; although.

While that guitar may look nice, it's not a very good instrument.

conjunction
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0
At the same time that.

While you're up, close the door.

conjunction
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0
Until.
conjunction
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0
Until.
preposition
0
0
To spend (time) in a pleasant way; cause to pass idly.

To while away the afternoon.

verb
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An uncertain duration of time, a period of time.

He lectured for quite a long while.

noun
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0
During the same time that.

He was sleeping while I was singing.

conjunction
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0
(Northern England, Scotland) Until.

I'll wait while you've finished painting.

conjunction
0
0
As long as.

While you're at school you may live at home.

conjunction
0
0
To pass (time) idly.
verb
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0
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To loiter.

verb
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between whiles
  • Now and then; at intervals.
idiom
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0
the while
  • At the same time; during this very time.
idiom
0
0
worth someone's while
  • Worth someone's time, consideration, etc.; profitable in some way.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

between whiles
worth someone's while

Origin of while

  • Middle English from Old English hwīl kweiə- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English hwÄ«l, from Proto-Germanic *hwÄ«lō. Cognate with Low German wil, German Weile.
    From Wiktionary