Though meaning

thō
Though is defined as even if, or in spite of, the fact.

An example of though is driving in the face of a very dangerous storm.

conjunction
13
5
Conceding or supposing that; even if.

Though they may not succeed, they will still try.

conjunction
10
0
Despite the fact that; although.

He still argues, though he knows he's wrong. Even though it was raining, she walked to work.

conjunction
9
2
Even if; supposing that.

Though he may fail, he will have tried.

conjunction
8
0
However; nevertheless.

Snow is not predicted; we can expect some rain, though.

adverb
7
1
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(informal) Used as an intensive.

Wouldn't that beat all, though?

adverb
6
0
In spite of the fact that; notwithstanding that; although.

Though the car was repaired, it rattled.

conjunction
4
0
(archaic) If, that, even if.

We shall be not sorry though the man die tonight.

conjunction
4
0
Despite the fact that; although.

Though it's risky, it's worth taking the chance.

conjunction
3
0
And yet.

They will probably win, though no one else thinks so.

conjunction
3
1
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However; nevertheless.

She sings well, though.

adverb
3
1
(conjunctive) Despite that; however.

I will do it, though.

adverb
3
1
(degree) Used to intensify statements or questions; indeed.

"Man, it's hot in here." "” "Isn't it, though?"

adverb
3
1

Origin of though

  • Middle English of Scandinavian origin to- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English thaugh, thagh, from Old English þēah (“ though, although, even if, that, however, nevertheless, yet, still; whether"), later superseded in many dialects by Middle English though, thogh, from Old Norse *þóh (later þó); both from Proto-Germanic *þauh (“though"), from Proto-Indo-European *to-. Akin to Scots thoch (“though"), Saterland Frisian dach (“though"), West Frisian dôch, dochs (“though"), Dutch doch (“though"), German doch (“though"), Swedish dock (“however, still"), Icelandic þó (“though"). More at that.

    From Wiktionary