Occasion definition

ə-kāzhən
(archaic) Personal requirements or necessities.
noun
13
6
An event or happening, or the time of an event or happening.

On several occasions, we saw him riding a motorcycle.

noun
13
7
A cause of or reason for something.

A trade disagreement that furnished the occasion for war.

noun
9
3
A significant event, especially a large or important social gathering.

The reception proved to be quite the occasion.

noun
6
2
A favorable or appropriate time or juncture.

Saw the layoff as an occasion to change careers.

noun
6
2
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A significant event, especially a large or important social gathering.

The reception proved to be quite the occasion.

noun
2
0
A favorable or appropriate time or juncture.

Saw the layoff as an occasion to change careers.

noun
2
0
A favorable time or juncture; opportunity.
noun
3
2
(archaic) Personal requirements or necessities.
noun
1
0
(archaic) Affairs; business.
noun
1
0
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To provide occasion for; cause.
verb
2
2
A need created by a particular circumstance.
noun
1
1
An event or happening, or the time of an event or happening.

On several occasions, we saw him riding a motorcycle.

noun
1
1
Occasion is a special event or a specific time when something is possible or when something will happen.

An example of an occasion is a birthday.

noun
0
0
A cause of or reason for something.

A trade disagreement that furnished the occasion for war.

noun
0
0
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A need created by a particular circumstance.
noun
0
0
Need arising from circumstances.
noun
0
0
A happening; occurrence.
noun
0
0
The time at which something happens; particular time.

On the occasion of our last meeting.

noun
0
0
(obs.) Needs; requirements.
noun
0
0
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A favorable opportunity; a convenient or timely chance. [from 14th c.]
noun
0
0
The time when something happens.

At this point, she seized the occasion to make her own observation.

noun
0
0
An occurrence or state of affairs which causes some event or reaction; a motive or reason. [from 14th c.]

I had no occasion to feel offended, however.

noun
0
0
A particular happening; an instance or time when something occurred. [from 15th c.]

I could think of two separate occasions when she had deliberately lied to me.

noun
0
0
Need; requirement, necessity. [from 16th c.]
  • Jeremy Taylor.
    After we have served ourselves and our own occasions.
  • Burke.
    When my occasions took me into France.

I have no occasion for firearms.

noun
0
0
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A special event or function. [from 19th c.]

Having people round for dinner was always quite an occasion at our house.

noun
0
0
A reason or excuse; a motive; a persuasion.
noun
0
0
To give occasion to; to cause; to produce; to induce; as, to occasion anxiety.

It is seen that the mental changes are occasioned by a change of polarity.

verb
0
0
To provide occasion for; cause.
verb
1
2
A fact, event, or state of affairs that makes something else possible.

A chance meeting was the occasion of the renewal of their friendship.

noun
1
2
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A cause or reason.

You have no occasion to be angry.

noun
1
2
A special time or event, suitable for celebration.
noun
1
2
To be the occasion of; give occasion to; cause.
verb
1
2
Something which causes something else; a cause. [from 14th c.]
noun
0
1
on occasion
  • From time to time; now and then.
idiom
1
0
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rise to the occasion
  • To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
idiom
1
0
take the occasion
  • To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
idiom
1
0
on occasion
  • From time to time; now and then.
idiom
1
0
rise to the occasion
  • To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
idiom
2
0
take the occasion
  • To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
idiom
1
0
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on occasion
  • once in a while; sometimes; occasionally
idiom
1
0
rise to the occasion
  • to do whatever suddenly becomes necessary; meet an emergency
idiom
1
0
take (the) occasion
  • to use the opportunity (to do something)
idiom
1
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
occasion
Plural:
occasions

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of occasion

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin occāsiō occāsiōn- from occāsus past participle of occidere to fall ob- down ob– cadere to fall kad- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin occāsiō occāsiōn- from occāsus past participle of occidere to fall ob- down ob– cadere to fall kad- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French ocasion, from Latin occasionem (accusative of occasio), noun of action from perfect passive participle occasus, from verb occido, from prefix ob- (“down", "away") + verb cado (“fall").

    From Wiktionary