Reason meaning

rēzən
Reason is the cause for something to happen or the power of your brain to think, understand and engage in logical thought.

An example of reason is when you are late because your car ran out of gas.

An example of reason is the ability to think logically.

noun
16
5
To persuade or dissuade (someone) with reasons.
verb
10
6
The ability to think, form judgments, draw conclusions, etc.
noun
9
4
To think coherently and logically; draw inferences or conclusions from facts known or assumed.
verb
7
5
To talk or argue logically and persuasively.

Tried to reason with her son to eat a good breakfast.

verb
5
2
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To engage in conversation or discussion.
verb
5
2
An explanation or justification of an act, idea, etc.
noun
5
2
To determine or conclude by logical thinking.

The doctor reasoned that the patient had a virus.

verb
5
3
To use the faculty of reason; think logically.

What would lead you to reason so?

verb
4
2
A cause or motive.
noun
4
3
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Normal mental powers; a sound mind; sanity.
noun
2
2
To reason is to think things through, to use logic, or to try to solve a problem with logic.

An example of reason is when you think though a problem logically.

verb
2
3
Sound thought or judgment; good sense.
noun
2
3
(uncountable) Rational thinking (the capacity for it; the cognitive faculties, collectively, of conception, judgment, deduction and intuition.

Mankind should develop reason above all other virtues.

noun
1
0
(intransitive) To exercise the rational faculty; to deduce inferences from premises; to perform the process of deduction or of induction; to ratiocinate; to reach conclusions by a systematic comparison of facts.
verb
1
0
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(intransitive) Hence: To carry on a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to formulate and set forth propositions and the inferences from them; to argue.
verb
1
0
(usually with out) To find by logical process; to explain or justify by reason or argument.

To reason out the causes of the librations of the moon.

verb
1
0
To think logically about; think out systematically; analyze.
verb
1
1
To argue or talk in a logical way.
verb
0
1
To argue, conclude, or infer.
verb
0
1
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To support, justify, etc. with reasons.
verb
0
1
To persuade or bring by reasoning (into or out of)
verb
0
1
  • That which causes something: an efficient cause, a proximate cause.
    The reason this tree fell is that it had rotted.
  • A motive for an action or a determination.
    The reason I robbed the bank was that I needed the money.
    If you don't give me a reason to go with you, I won't.
  • An excuse: a thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation.
noun
0
1
(intransitive) To converse; to compare opinions.
verb
0
1
To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss.

I reasoned the matter with my friend.

verb
0
1
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(rare) To support with reasons, as a request.
verb
0
1
To persuade by reasoning or argument.

To reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan.

verb
0
1
(with down) To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons.

To reason down a passion.

verb
0
1
by reason of
  • Because of.
idiom
0
0
in reason
  • With good sense or justification; reasonably.
idiom
0
0
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within reason
  • Within the bounds of good sense or practicality.
idiom
0
0
with reason
  • With good cause; justifiably.
idiom
0
0
by reason of
  • Because of.
idiom
0
0
in reason
  • In accord with what is reasonable.
idiom
0
0
out of all reason
  • Unreasonable.
idiom
0
0
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with reason
  • Justifiably; rightly.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

by reason of
in reason
with reason
by reason of
in reason
out of all reason
with reason

Origin of reason

  • Middle English from Old French raison from Latin ratiō ratiōn- from ratus past participle of rērī to consider, think ar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman raisun (Old French raison), from Latin rationem, an accusative of ratio, from ratus, past participle of reor (“think").

    From Wiktionary