Discourse meaning

dĭskôrs
The definition of discourse is a discussion about a topic either in writing or face to face.

An example of discourse is a professor meeting with a student to discuss a book.

noun
36
4
Discourse is defined as to talk about a subject.

An example of discourse is two politicians talking about current events.

verb
17
7
Communication of ideas, information, etc., esp. by talking; conversation.
noun
9
3
To carry on conversation; talk; confer.
verb
9
5
(intransitive) To engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.
verb
6
3
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To speak or write (on or upon a subject) formally and at some length.
verb
4
2
(uncountable, archaic) Verbal exchange, conversation.
noun
3
1
(countable) Any rational expression, reason.
noun
1
1
A formal, lengthy treatment of a subject, either written or spoken.
noun
1
2
To utter or tell.
verb
1
2
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(social sciences, countable) An institutionalized way of thinking, a social boundary defining what can be said about a specific topic (after Michel Foucault).
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To write or speak formally and at length.
verb
0
0
To exercise reason; to employ the mind in judging and inferring; to reason.

verb
0
0
Verbal expression in speech or writing.

Political discourse.

noun
0
1
Verbal exchange or conversation.

Listened to their discourse on foreign policy.

noun
0
1
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To speak or write formally and at length.
verb
0
1
To engage in conversation or discussion; converse.
verb
0
1
To narrate or discuss.
verb
0
1
A long and formal treatment of a subject, in speech or writing; lecture; treatise; dissertation.
noun
0
1
Ability to reason; rationality.
noun
0
1
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(uncountable) Expression in words, either speech or writing.
noun
0
1
(countable) A formal lengthy exposition of some subject, either spoken or written.

The preacher gave us a long discourse on duty.

noun
0
1
The process or power of reasoning.
noun
0
2

Origin of discourse

  • Middle English discours process of reasoning from Medieval Latin discursus from Latin a running about from past participle of discurrere to run about dis- apart dis– currere to run kers- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English discours, from Middle French discours (“conversation, speech”), from Late Latin discursus (“the act of running about”), from Latin discurrō (“run about”), from dis- (“apart”) + currō (“run”). Spelling modified by influence of Middle French cours (“course”).

    From Wiktionary