Descant meaning

dĕskănt
Frequency:
To comment at length; discourse.
verb
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In medieval music,
  • Two-part singing in which there is a fixed, known melody and an additional but subordinate melody that is higher in pitch.
  • This added upper melody.
  • The highest voice in polyphonic singing, as the treble or soprano.
noun
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A varied song or melody.
noun
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A comment; criticism; discourse.
noun
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A discussion or discourse on a theme.
noun
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To talk or write at length; comment expansively; discourse (on or upon)
verb
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To sing or play a descant to the main melody.
verb
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To sing.
verb
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A lengthy discourse on a subject.
noun
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(music) A counterpoint melody sung or played above the theme.
noun
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(intransitive) To discuss at length.
verb
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(intransitive) To sing or play a descant.
verb
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Origin of descant

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman descaunt from Medieval Latin discantus a refrain Latin dis- dis- Latin cantus song (from past participle of canere to sing kan- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman descaunt, from Medieval Latin discantus.

    From Wiktionary