Warble definition

wôrbəl
To sing (a note or song, for example) with trills, runs, or other melodic embellishments.
verb
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To sing with trills, runs, or quavers.
verb
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To be sounded in a trilling or quavering manner.
verb
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The act or an instance of singing with trills, runs, or quavers.
noun
2
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To modulate a tone's frequency.
verb
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To sing like a bird, especially with trills.
verb
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A hard lump of tissue on a riding horse's back caused by rubbing of the saddle.
noun
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An abscessed boillike swelling on the back of cattle, deer, and certain other animals, caused by the larva of a warble fly.
noun
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The warble fly, especially in its larval stage.
noun
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To sing (a song, notes, etc.) melodiously, with trills, quavers, runs, etc., as a bird does.
verb
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To express in song.
verb
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To sing melodiously, with trills, etc.
verb
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verb
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The act of warbling.
noun
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A warbling sound; trill.
noun
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A small, hard tumor on the back of a horse, caused by the rubbing and pressing of a saddle.
noun
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A lump or swelling under the hide of an animal, esp. on the back, caused by the presence of a larva of a botfly, esp. a warble fly.
noun
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A hard lump of tissue on a riding horse's back caused by rubbing of the saddle.
noun
0
0
An abscessed boillike swelling on the back of cattle, deer, and certain other animals, caused by the larva of a warble fly.
noun
0
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The warble fly, especially in its larval stage.
noun
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To cause to quaver or vibrate.
verb
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(intransitive) To be quavered or modulated; to be uttered melodiously.
verb
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(military) In naval mine warfare, the process of varying the frequency of sound produced by a narrow band noisemaker to ensure that the frequency to which the mine will respond is covered.
noun
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A lesion under the skin of cattle, caused by the larva of a bot fly of genus Hypoderma.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
warble
Plural:
warbles

Origin of warble

  • Middle English werbelen from Old North French werbler dialectal variant of Old French guerbler to sing in a certain way (perhaps by modulating) of Germanic origin Middle Dutch wervelen Old Norse hvirfla to whirl

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably of Scandinavian origin obsolete Swedish varbulde

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English werble, (at least for the noun) from Frankish werbel (mole cricket), cognate to Walloon waerbea.

    From Wiktionary