Lecture meaning

lĕk'chər
An exposition of a given subject delivered before an audience or class, as for the purpose of instruction.
noun
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To deliver a lecture to (a class or audience).
verb
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The definition of a lecture is a talk given on a particular subject or a scolding given after someone does something wrong.

An example of a lecture is a talk on natural sciences.

An example of a lecture is a parent's talk about being honest to a child after the child has lied.

noun
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1
To deliver a lecture or series of lectures.
verb
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To admonish or reprove earnestly, often at length.

Always lecturing me about my manners.

verb
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A lengthy rebuke or scolding.
noun
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To give a lecture or lectures.
verb
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To give a lecture to.
verb
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A spoken lesson or exposition, usually delivered to a group.
  • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity.
    The stories did not seem to me to touch life. [...] They left me with the impression of a well-delivered stereopticon lecture, with characters about as life-like as the shadows on the screen, and whisking on and off, at the mercy of the operator.

During class today the professor delivered an interesting lecture.

noun
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I really don't want you to give me a lecture about my bad eating habits.

noun
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(intransitive) To teach (somebody) by giving a speech on a given topic.

The professor lectured to two classes this morning.

verb
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To preach, to berate, to scold.

Emily's father lectured her about the importance of being home before midnight.

verb
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To lecture is defined as to deliver a speech or to talk to someone about why he or she was wrong.

An example of lecture is for a priest to deliver a sermon.

An example of lecture is for a parent to tell his child why stealing is wrong.

verb
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An earnest admonition or reproof; a reprimand.
noun
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1

Origin of lecture

  • Middle English a reading from Old French from Medieval Latin lēctūra from Latin lēctus past participle of legere to read leg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Medieval Latin lectura (“reading"), from Latin lectus, past participle of legō (“I read, I recite").
    From Wiktionary