Rag meaning

răg
An act or instance of ragging.
noun
5
1
To tease, scold, criticize, or nag.
verb
3
0
Rag means a leftover, worn down or small cloth usually used for cleaning, or is slang for a worn down piece of clothing.

An example of a rag is an old sock used for cleaning windows.

An example of a rag is a glove with holes in the finger tips.

noun
2
0
Rag is defined as to tease, joke with or nag.

An example of rag is calling someone by a nickname they don't like.

An example of rag is a husband always telling his wife to "hurry up."

verb
2
0
A piece written in ragtime.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
A coarse kind of rock, somewhat cellular in texture; ragstone.
noun
1
0
To tease or torment, especially at a university; to bully, to haze.
verb
1
0
The definition of rag is made of worn down cloth or clothing.

An example of rag used as an adjective is a doll made of old cotton shirts; a rag doll.

adjective
0
0
Threadbare or tattered clothing.
noun
0
0
Cloth converted to pulp for making paper.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A scrap; a fragment.
noun
0
0
A newspaper, especially one specializing in sensationalism or gossip.
noun
0
0
The stringy central portion and membranous walls of a citrus fruit.
noun
0
0
To play a joke on.
verb
0
0
In ice hockey, to maintain possession of (the puck) by outmaneuvering opposing players, especially so as to kill a penalty.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
A practical joke; a prank.
noun
0
0
A roofing slate with one rough surface.
noun
0
0
A coarsely textured rock.
noun
0
0
To compose or play (a piece) in ragtime.
verb
0
0
A waste piece of cloth, esp. one that is old or torn.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A small piece of cloth for dusting, cleaning, washing, etc.
noun
0
0
The axis and white, tough membrane of citrus fruits.
noun
0
0
Cotton and other cloth fibers used in making high-quality papers for documents, stationery, etc.
noun
0
0
A newspaper, esp. one viewed with contempt.
noun
0
0
Made of rags.

A rag mop.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Of or involved in the manufacture and sale of clothing, esp. women's clothing.

The rag trade.

adjective
0
0
To play a practical joke or jokes on.
verb
0
0
(one of) A series of activities by university students to raise money for charity.
noun
0
0
A roofing slate with one rough side.
noun
0
0
A composition in ragtime.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To play in ragtime.
verb
0
0
To break (ore) into lumps for sorting.
verb
0
0
To cut or dress roughly, as a grindstone.
verb
0
0
(in the plural) Tattered clothes.
noun
0
0
A piece of old cloth; a tattered piece of cloth; a shred, a tatter.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A shabby, beggarly fellow; a ragamuffin.
noun
0
0
A ragged edge in metalworking.
noun
0
0
(nautical, slang) A sail, or any piece of canvas.
noun
0
0
(slang, pejorative) A newspaper, magazine.
noun
0
0
(poker slang) A card that appears to help no one.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(poker slang) A low card.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To become tattered.
verb
0
0
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
0
0
(UK slang) To drive a car or another vehicle in a hard, fast or unsympathetic manner.
verb
0
0
(dated) A prank or practical joke.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(UK, Ireland) A society run by university students for the purpose of charitable fundraising.
noun
0
0
A ragtime song, dance or piece of music. [from 19th c.]
noun
0
0
Anything considered to resemble a rag in appearance or in lack of value.
noun
0
1
To scold or rail at; to rate; to tease; to torment; to banter.
verb
0
1
on the rag
  • Menstruating.
  • Irritable; grouchy.
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
chew the rag
  • To chat.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of rag

  • Middle English ragge ultimately (probably partly by back-formation from raggi shaggy, ragged) of Old Norse origin Old Icelandic rögg tuft Swedish ragg shaggy hair

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from ragged

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old Norse rÇ«gg (“tuft, shagginess"). Cognate with Swedish ragg.

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin uncertain; perhaps the same word as Etymology 2, below.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps from ragged. Compare later ragtime.

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin uncertain.

    From Wiktionary