Dun meaning

dŭn
Dun is defined as a dull grayish-brown color or something that is that color.

An example of dun is brown hair that is starting to grey.

noun
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The definition of dun is a dull grayish-brown.

An example of something dun is moldy chocolate.

adjective
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To importune (a debtor) for payment.

A dunning letter.

verb
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One that duns.
noun
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An importunate demand for payment.
noun
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An almost neutral brownish gray to dull grayish brown.
noun
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A horse of this color.
noun
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Dull grayish-brown.
adjective
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A dull grayish-brown color.
noun
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A dun horse.
noun
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An artificial fishing fly of this color.
noun
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The mayfly in its stage just before final molting.
noun
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To ask (a debtor) insistently or repeatedly for payment.
verb
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To annoy constantly.
verb
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A person who duns.
noun
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An insistent demand, esp. for payment of a debt.
noun
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(DialUp Networking) The dial-up networking capability in Windows 95/98. See Win Dial-up Networking.
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Of a brownish grey colour.
adjective
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(countable) A collector of debts.
noun
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An urgent request or demand of payment.

He sent his debtor a dun.

noun
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To ask or beset a debtor for payment.
verb
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To harass by continually repeating e.g. a request.
verb
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A valley in the Himalayan foothills, e.g. Dehra Dun.
noun
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(countable) A newly hatched, immature mayfly.
noun
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(informal) Eye dialect spelling of done: simple past tense and past participle of do.

He dun it before and he dun it again.

Now, ya dun it!

verb
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Eye dialect spelling of don't.
contraction
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To cure, as codfish, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with saltgrass or a similar substance.
verb
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A mound or small hill.
noun
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(humorous) Imitating suspenseful music.
interjection
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(uncountable) A brownish grey colour.

noun
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Origin of dun

  • Middle English from Old English dunn perhaps of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dun, dunne, from Old English dunn (“dun, dingy brown, bark-colored, brownish black”), from Proto-Germanic *dusnaz (“brown, yellow”), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- (“to smoke, raise dust”). Cognate with Old Saxon dun (“brown, dark”), Old High German tusin (“ash-gray, dull brown, pale yellow, dark”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternative etymology derives the Old English word from Late Brythonic (cf. Old Welsh dwnn 'dark (red)'), from Proto-Celtic *dusno (cf. Old Irish donn), from Proto-Indo-European *dwos (cf. Old Saxon dosan 'chestnut brown'). More at dusk.

    From Wiktionary

  • Unknown; perhaps a variant of din.

    From Wiktionary

  • See don’t.

    From Wiktionary

  • See done.

    From Wiktionary

  • See dune.

    From Wiktionary

  • Imitative.

    From Wiktionary