Fawn meaning

fôn
To fawn means to pay extra attention to something in an overly affectionate way.

An example of to fawn is how a young girl acts towards a boy she likes.

verb
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The definition of a fawn is a young deer, still covered in spots.

An example of a fawn is the character Bambi.

noun
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Fawn is defined as a light yellow brown color, often used to describe the color of an animal’s coat.

An example of fawn is the name of a winter coat’s color in a catalog.

noun
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To exhibit affection or attempt to please, as a dog does by wagging its tail, whining, or cringing.
verb
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A young deer, especially one less than a year old.
noun
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A grayish yellow-brown to moderate reddish brown.
noun
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To show friendliness by licking hands, wagging its tail, etc.
verb
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To try to gain favor by acting servilely; cringe and flatter.

Courtiers fawning on a king.

verb
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To show affection in a solicitous or exaggerated way.
verb
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A young deer less than one year old.
noun
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A pale yellowish-brown color.
noun
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Of this color.
adjective
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To bring forth (young)
verb
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noun
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A pale brown colour tinted with yellow, like that of a fawn.

noun
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Of the fawn colour.
adjective
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(intransitive) To give birth to a fawn.
verb
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(intransitive) To exhibit affection or attempt to please.
verb
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(intransitive) To seek favour by flattery and obsequious behaviour (with on or upon).
verb
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(intransitive, of a dog) To wag its tail, to show devotion.
verb
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To seek favor or attention by flattery and obsequious behavior.
verb
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Origin of fawn

  • Middle English from Old French foun, faon, feon young animal from Vulgar Latin fētō *fētōn- from Latin fētus offspring dhē(i)- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English faunen from Old English fagnian to rejoice from fagen, fægen glad

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fawnen, from Old English fahnian, fagnian, fæġnian (“to rejoice, make glad”). Akin to Old Norse fagna (“to rejoice”). See also fain.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French faon.

    From Wiktionary