Crowd meaning

kroud
The definition of a crowd is a large number of people or things gathered closely together.

An example of crowd is the group of people that come together for the ball dropping on New Years Eve in Times Square in New York City.

noun
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The common people; the populace.
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A group of people united by a common characteristic, as age, interest, or vocation.

The over-30 crowd.

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A group of people attending a public function; an audience.

The play drew a small but appreciative crowd.

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Crowd is defined as to push, shove or force too closely together.

An example of to crowd is a woman sitting way too close to a man in a bar who isn't interested in her.

verb
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To push, to press, to shove.
verb
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A large number of persons gathered together; a throng.
noun
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A large number of things positioned or considered together.
noun
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To gather together in a limited space.

The children crowded around the TV.

verb
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To move forward by pressing or shoving.

A bevy of reporters crowded toward the candidate.

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To force by pressing or shoving.

Police crowded the spectators back to the viewing stand.

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To force away by taking up space; displace.

Urban sprawl crowded the farmers out of the valley.

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To draw or stand very near or too near to.

The batter crowded the plate. Please don't crowd me.

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To press, cram, or force tightly together.

Crowded the clothes into the closet.

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To fill or occupy to overflowing.

Books crowded the shelves.

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To put pressure on; assail.

Dark thoughts were crowding him.

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An ancient Celtic stringed instrument that was bowed or plucked.
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A fiddle.
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To press, push, or squeeze.
verb
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To push one's way (forward, into, through, etc.)
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To come together in a large group; throng.
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To press, push, or shove.
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To press or force closely together; cram.
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To fill too full; occupy to excess, as by pressing or thronging.
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To put (a person) under pressure or stress, as by dunning or harassing.
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A large number of people or things gathered closely together.
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The common people; the masses.
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A group of people having something in common; set; clique.
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A violin.
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To press or drive together; to mass together.
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To fill by pressing or thronging together; hence, to encumber by excess of numbers or quantity.
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To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.
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(nautical) To approach another ship too closely when it has right of way.
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(intransitive) To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng.
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(intransitive) To urge or press forward; to force oneself.

A man crowds into a room.

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(nautical) (of a square-rigged ship) To carry excessive sail.
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Several things collected or closely pressed together; also, some things adjacent to each other.

There was a crowd of toys pushed beneath the couch where the children were playing.

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(with definite article) The so-called lower orders of people; the populace, vulgar.
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A group of people united or at least characterised by a common interest.

That obscure author's fans were a nerdy crowd which hardly ever interacted before the Internet age.

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(now dialectal) A fiddle.
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(obsolete, intransitive) To play on a crowd; to fiddle.
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A group of people congregated or collected into a close body without order.

After the movie let out, a crowd of people pushed through the exit doors.

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crowd (on) sail
  • To spread a large amount of sail to increase speed.
idiom
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crowd (on) sail
  • To put up an unusually large number of sails in order to increase the ship's speed.
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crowd out
  • To force (someone or something) out of a limited space by arriving or appearing there.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

crowd (on) sail
crowd (on) sail

Origin of crowd

  • From Middle English crowden to crowd, press from Old English crūdan to hasten, press

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English croud from Middle Welsh crwth

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English crūdan. Cognate with Dutch kruien.

    From Wiktionary

  • Celtic, from Welsh crwth.

    From Wiktionary