Herd meaning

hûrd
The definition of a herd is a big group of animals or people who share the same characteristics.

An example of a herd is a group of cattle, sheep or elephants who all live and travel together.

An example of a herd is a group of people who all dress and act in a similar way.

noun
17
5
(intransitive, Scotland) To act as a herdsman or a shepherd.
verb
13
2
To form or put into a herd.

I heard the herd of cattle being herded home from a long way away.

verb
11
2
To come together in a herd.

The sheep herded for warmth.

verb
10
4
To herd is defined as to round up and cause animals and people to move in a specific direction.

An example of herd is when you direct cows to all move in the same direction.

verb
6
3
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To gather, keep, or drive (animals) in a herd.
verb
4
1
To gather and place into a group or mass.

Herded the children into the auditorium.

verb
3
0
A number of cattle, sheep, or other animals feeding, living, or being driven together.
noun
3
0
(intransitive) To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company.

Sheep herd on many hills.

verb
3
0
To tend (sheep or cattle).
verb
3
1
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To gather together or move as a herd, group, crowd, etc.
verb
1
0
A herdsman.

Cowherd, shepherd.

noun
1
0
A number of domestic animals assembled together under the watch or ownership of a keeper. [from 11th c.]
noun
1
0
Any collection of animals gathered or travelling in a company. [from 13th c.]
noun
1
0
A crowd, a mass of people; now usually pejorative: a rabble. [from 15th c.]
noun
1
0
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(intransitive) To associate; to ally one's self with, or place one's self among, a group or company.

I’ll herd among his friends, and seem One of the number. Addison.

verb
1
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(now rare) Someone who keeps a group of domestic animals; a herdsman.
noun
1
0
To tend or drive as a herdsman.
verb
1
1
ride herd on
  • to control a moving herd of (cattle) from horseback
  • to keep a close or oppressive watch or control over
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of herd

  • Middle English from Old English heord

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English herde, heerde, heorde, from Old English hierd, heord (“herd, flock; keeping, care, custody”), from Proto-Germanic *herdō (“herd”), from Proto-Indo-European *kerdʰ- (“file, row, herd”). Cognate with German Herde, Swedish hjord. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian herdhe, çerdhe (“bird nest, cradle, kindergarten”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English hirde, hierde, from Proto-Germanic *hirdijaz. Cognate with German Hirte, Swedish herde, Danish hyrde.

    From Wiktionary