Flock meaning

flŏk
To flock means to group together.

An example of to flock is to wait with a group of people for a famous person’s autograph.

verb
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A group of animals that live, travel, or feed together.
noun
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A flock is defined as a group of followers of a religion or a religious leader.

An example of a flock is the members of a specific church.

noun
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The definition of a flock is a group of certain animals like birds, goats and sheep that eat, live and move as a group.

An example of a flock is a group of geese flying in a “v” shape in the sky.

noun
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Waste wool or cotton used for stuffing furniture and mattresses.
noun
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Pulverized wool or felt that is applied to paper, cloth, or metal to produce a texture or pattern.
noun
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To stuff with waste wool or cotton.
verb
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To texture or pattern with pulverized wool or felt.
verb
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A group of certain animals, as goats or sheep, or of birds, living, feeding, or moving together.
noun
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A group of people under the leadership of one person, especially the members of a church.
noun
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Any group, esp. a large one, as the members of a church or the children in a family.
noun
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To assemble or travel in a flock or crowd.
verb
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A large crowd or number.

A flock of visitors; a flock of questions.

noun
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To gather or travel in a flock or crowd.
verb
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A tuft, as of fiber or hair.
noun
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noun
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To stuff or decorate with flock.
verb
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To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.
verb
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Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding.
noun
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A lock of wool or hair.
noun
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Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.
noun
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To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles.
verb
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A small tuft of wool, cotton, etc.
noun
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Wool or cotton waste used to stuff upholstered furniture, mattresses, etc.
noun
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Tiny, fine fibers of wool, rayon, etc. applied to a fabric, wallpaper, or the like to form a velvetlike pattern.
noun
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A large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration.
noun
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A large number of animals, especially sheep or goats kept together.
noun
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Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.
noun
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A large number of people.
noun
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(intransitive) To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.

People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.

verb
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Origin of flock

  • Middle English flok from Old French floc from Latin floccus tuft of wool

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English flok from Old English floc

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English flok (“tuft of wool”), from Old French floc (“tuft of wool”), from Late Latin floccus (“tuft of wool”), probably from Frankish *flokko (“down, wool, flock”), from Proto-Germanic *flukkōn-, *flukkan-, *fluksōn- (“down, flock”), from Proto-Indo-European *plAwək- (“hair, fibres, tuft”). Cognate with Old High German flocko (“down”), Middle Dutch vlocke (“flock”), Norwegian dialectal flugsa (“snowflake”). Other cognate Albanian flokë (“hair”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English flock (“flock”), from Old English flocc (“flock, company, troop”), from Proto-Germanic *flukkaz, *flakka- (“crowd, troop”). Cognate with Middle Low German vlocke (“crowd, flock”), Old Norse flokkr (“crowd, troop, band, flock”). Perhaps related to Old English folc (“crowd, troop, band”). More at folk.

    From Wiktionary