Folk meaning

fōk
Frequency:
Folk means people in general, or a specific group of people.

An example of folk is saying that Amish people live a simple life; simple life of the Amish folk.

noun
10
4
(informal) People in general.

Folks around here are very friendly.

noun
5
2
Of, occurring in, or originating among the common people.

Folk culture; a folk hero.

adjective
5
2
People of a specified group or kind.

City folks; rich folk.

noun
4
2
People in general; persons.

City folk sometimes vacation in the country; folks differ in their tastes.

pluralNoun
4
3
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noun
2
0
(plural only) People in general.

Young folk, old folk, everybody come, / To our little Sunday School and have a lot of fun.

noun
2
0
(plural only) A particular group of people.
noun
2
0
The definition of folk is someone or something associated with traditional or common culture.

An example of folk is the music of Bob Dylan.

adjective
2
1
The inhabitants of a region especially the native inhabitants.
noun
1
1
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(plural only, plural: folks) One’s relatives especially one’s parents.
noun
1
1
(music) Folk music.
noun
1
1
Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of a land, their culture, tradition, or history.
adjective
0
0
Of or pertaining to common people as opposed to ruling classes or elites.
adjective
0
0
(archaic) A grouping of smaller peoples or tribes as a nation.
noun
0
0
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Of, originating among, or having to do with the common people, who transmit the general culture of the group through succeeding generations.

Folk art.

adjective
0
1
(informal) just folks
  • Down-to-earth, open-hearted.
idiom
1
0
just (plain) folks
  • people who are regarded as simple, unassuming, not snobbish, etc.
idiom
1
0
one's folks
  • one's family or relatives; esp., one's parents
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of folk

  • Middle English from Old English folc pelə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English folk, from Old English folc, from Proto-Germanic *fulką (compare West Frisian folk, Dutch volk and German Volk), from *fulka- ("crowd, army"), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go (compare Welsh ôl 'track', Lithuanian pulkas 'crowd', Old Church Slavonic plŭkŭ 'army division', Albanian plog 'barn, heap'; the Slavic and Lithuanian words may have been borrowed from Proto-Germanic instead). (Some have also attempted to link the word to Latin vulgus, populus or plebs.) Related to follow.

    From Wiktionary